maritime


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Related to maritime: Maritime studies

mar·i·time

 (măr′ĭ-tīm′)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or adjacent to the sea.
2. Of or relating to marine shipping or navigation. See Synonyms at nautical.
3. Of or resembling a mariner.
4. Meteorology
a. Of or relating to the relatively moist air typically found or originating over large bodies of water.
b. Of or relating to climates whose seasonal variation in temperatures is moderated by large bodies of water nearby.

[Latin maritimus, from mare, mari-, sea; see mori- in Indo-European roots.]

maritime

(ˈmærɪˌtaɪm)
adj
1. (Nautical Terms) of or relating to navigation, shipping, etc; seafaring
2. (Physical Geography) of, relating to, near, or living near the sea
3. (Physical Geography) (of a climate) having small temperature differences between summer and winter; equable
[C16: from Latin maritimus from mare sea]

mar•i•time

(ˈmær ɪˌtaɪm)

adj.
1. pertaining to navigation or shipping on the sea.
2. of or pertaining to the sea: maritime weather.
3. bordering on the sea: a maritime state.
4. living near or in the sea: maritime plants.
5. characteristic of sailors; nautical.
[1540–50; < Latin maritimus of the sea =mari- (s. of mare sea) + -timus adj. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.maritime - relating to or involving ships or shipping or navigation or seamenmaritime - relating to or involving ships or shipping or navigation or seamen; "nautical charts"; "maritime law"; "marine insurance"
2.maritime - bordering on or living or characteristic of those near the seamaritime - bordering on or living or characteristic of those near the sea; "a maritime province"; "maritime farmers"; "maritime cultures"
coastal - located on or near or bordering on a coast; "coastal marshes"; "coastal waters"; "the Atlantic coastal plain"

maritime

adjective
1. nautical, marine, naval, sea, oceanic, seafaring the largest maritime museum of its kind
2. coastal, seaside, littoral The country has a temperate, maritime climate.

maritime

adjective
1. Of or relating to the seas or oceans:
2. Of or relating to sea navigation:
Translations
بَحْريبَحْرِيّساحِلي
námořnípřímořský
maritimsøfarts-
merenkulku-
pomorski
hajós
siglinga-sjávar-
海事の
해사의
laivybos
jūras-piejūras-
prímorský
sjö-
ทางทะเล
deniz kenarında yaşayandenizcidenizciliğe aitdenizcilikle ilgiligemilerle ilgili
thuộc về hàng hải

maritime

[ˈmærɪtaɪm]
A. ADJmarítimo
B. CPD maritime law Nderecho m marítimo

maritime

[ˈmærɪtaɪm] adjmaritimemaritime law ndroit m maritime

maritime

adjSee-; maritime warfareSeekrieg m; maritime regionsKüstenregionen pl; maritime museum (for seafaring) → Schifffahrtsmuseum nt; (for marine science) → Meereskundemuseum nt

maritime

:
maritime law
nSeerecht nt
maritime nation
nSeefahrernation f
maritime power
nSeemacht f
Maritime Provinces
pl (Canada) the maritimedie (kanadischen) Ostprovinzen

maritime

[ˈmærɪˌtaɪm] adj (climate, nation, museum) → marittimo/a; (plant, creature) → marino/a

maritime

(ˈmӕritaim) adjective
1. of the sea, shipping etc. maritime law.
2. lying near the sea, and therefore having a navy, merchant shipping etc. a maritime nation.

maritime

بَحْرِيّ námořní maritim maritim θαλάσσιος marítimo merenkulku- maritime pomorski marittimo 海事の 해사의 maritiem maritim morski marítimo морской sjö- ทางทะเล denizcilikle ilgili thuộc về hàng hải 海事的
References in classic literature ?
1st, to all those which arise out of the laws of the United States, passed in pursuance of their just and constitutional powers of legislation; 2d, to all those which concern the execution of the provisions expressly contained in the articles of Union; 3d, to all those in which the United States are a party; 4th, to all those which involve the PEACE of the CONFEDERACY, whether they relate to the intercourse between the United States and foreign nations, or to that between the States themselves; 5th, to all those which originate on the high seas, and are of admiralty or maritime jurisdiction; and, lastly, to all those in which the State tribunals cannot be supposed to be impartial and unbiased.
Less technically, but not less correctly, the word "anchored," with its characteristic appearance and resolute sound, ought to be good enough for the newspapers of the greatest maritime country in the world.
No one having previously heard his history, could for the first time behold Father Mapple without the utmost interest, because there were certain engrafted clerical peculiarities about him, imputable to that adventurous maritime life he had led.
This island seems formed by nature to be the mistress of Greece, for it is entirely surrounded by a navigable ocean which washes almost all the maritime parts of that country, and is not far distant on the one side from Peloponnesus, on the other, which looks towards Asia, from Triopium and Rhodes.
America has already formed treaties with no less than six foreign nations, and all of them, except Prussia, are maritime, and therefore able to annoy and injure us.
Not to mention rumours which agitated the maritime population and excited the public mind, even in the interior of continents, seafaring men were particularly excited.
M'Kay, a half-breed; son of the unfortunate adventurer of the same name who came out in the first maritime expedition to Astoria and was blown up in the Tonquin.
And it must be confessed, that from the great intercourse of trade and commerce between both realms, from the continual reception of exiles which is mutual among them, and from the custom, in each empire, to send their young nobility and richer gentry to the other, in order to polish themselves by seeing the world, and understanding men and manners; there are few persons of distinction, or merchants, or seamen, who dwell in the maritime parts, but what can hold conversation in both tongues; as I found some weeks after, when I went to pay my respects to the emperor of Blefuscu, which, in the midst of great misfortunes, through the malice of my enemies, proved a very happy adventure to me, as I shall relate in its proper place.
The precise extent of the common law, and the statute law, the maritime law, the ecclesiastical law, the law of corporations, and other local laws and customs, remains still to be clearly and finally established in Great Britain, where accuracy in such subjects has been more industriously pursued than in any other part of the world.
Already Dantes had visited this maritime Bourse two or three times, and seeing all these hardy free-traders, who supplied the whole coast for nearly two hundred leagues in extent, he had asked himself what power might not that man attain who should give the impulse of his will to all these contrary and diverging minds.
WE have followed up the fortunes of the maritime part of this enterprise to the shores of the Pacific, and have conducted the affairs of the embryo establishment to the opening of the new year; let us now turn back to the adventurous band to whom was intrusted the land expedition, and who were to make their way to the mouth of the Columbia, up vast rivers, across trackless plains, and over the rugged barriers of the Rocky Mountains.
His fancy kindled early at the recitals he read of daring enterprise and maritime adventure, and he followed with enthusiasm the discoveries that signalized the first part of the nineteenth century.

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