market abuse


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market abuse

n
(Stock Exchange) (in Britain) a statutory offence which covers insider trading and stock market manipulation
References in periodicals archive ?
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has issued today its final Implementing Technical Standards (ITS) regarding the application of Market Abuse Regulation (MAR).
Market abuse practices uncovered because of foreign exchange rigging, led to heavy fines from US and European regulators.
This acquisition will enable Euronext to capture a sizeable market opportunity in insider list management created by the market abuse regulation.
Joseph Sansone, co-chief of the SEC Enforcement Division's Market Abuse Unit, said in January that Breton "assured clients that he would put their interests first but did just the opposite, taking the firm's most profitable trades for himself and dumping the losing trades on his clients.
Developed for financial institutions and regulators, Sybenetix's Behavioural Analytics Model applies algorithms to individual decision making to provide a holistic behavioural analysis of market abuse, conduct risk and investment performance.
In the workshop held at SECP head office on Tuesday, senior officials from the Surveillance, Supervision and Enforcement Department of the SECP briefed journalists on various types of market abuse and techniques to detect and deal with such manipulations.
In order to have a smoothly functioning securities market, market abuse must be pre-empted," Pierides said.
Bank Governor Mark Carney is backing plans to raise the maximum prison sentence for market abuse from seven to 10 years.
The review calls for UK criminal sanctions for market abuse to be extended to a wider range of areas and the lengthening of the maximum sentence available from seven to ten years.
analyse this data to detect market abuse and to bring enforcement
The Code is intended to provide guidance and clarity to the market abuse regime which, in its current form, has been in place in the Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC) since 2012.
Under the rules, banks and financial institutions will now be criminally liable, ensuring that crimes of market abuse and their consequences are taken seriously.