market day

(redirected from market days)
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Noun1.market day - a fixed day for holding a public marketmarket day - a fixed day for holding a public market
day - a day assigned to a particular purpose or observance; "Mother's Day"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
They would arrive on market days driv- ing in a peasant's cart, and would set up an office in an inn or some other Jew's house.
My mother always took him to the town on a market day in a light gig.
Someone needs to speak out about the lack of toilet facilities on London Road, especially on market days.
Chinda said the market day is the first of five market days over the next four months.
Ms Portas set out 28 recommendations in her December review, including planning changes to aid town centres, free parking and annual market days, while warning that high streets could "disappear forever" without urgent action.
AaAa Community Market Days by Emaar are popular social events that bring together our communities for a fun-filled day.
Mr Ahmad Al Falasi, Executive Director -- Property Management, Emaar Properties, said: "Community Market Days by Emaar are popular social events that bring together our communities for a fun-filled day.
Once June market days arrive, their months of planning, planting, and cultivation are in every farm-fresh product they bring to sell.
Enhanced with 50 maps and town plans, Morocco provides the traveler with expert insights into Moroccan history, art, religion, culture, festivals, and even local market days.
Half of the thefts have happened on busy market days, with culprits taking advantage of the large crowds attracted to the town on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
On its two market days, Thursdays and Sundays, it bursts with brilliant textiles, flowers, incense, fruits and vegetables, baskets, carved masks, handmade soap and other delightful souvenirs.
Extra market days are also being proposed and Glenn Fleet, the borough council's markets manager, said the move was being made to meet one of the authority's key corporate objectives - to ensure everyone had equal access to services.