marooner

marooner

(məˈruːnə)
n
a person, often a fugitive, who lives in a remote area and survives as a hunter or buccaneera person who has been marooned, esp on an island
References in classic literature ?
When she stole softly to the edge of the lagoon she might see them by the score, especially on Marooners' Rock, where they loved to bask, combing out their hair in a lazy way that quite irritated her; or she might even swim, on tiptoe as it were, to within a yard of them, but then they saw her and dived, probably splashing her with their tails, not by accident, but intentionally.
They treated all the boys in the same way, except of course Peter, who chatted with them on Marooners' Rock by the hour, and sat on their tails when they got cheeky.
It was one such day, and they were all on Marooners' Rock.
There crowded upon her all the stories she had been told of Marooners' Rock, so called because evil captains put sailors on it and leave them there to drown.
Marooners' Rock stood alone in the forbidding waters as if it were itself marooned.
The pirates have to be on a 24-hour watch and get into costume and roll-call when they spot flags from Big Beard (Big Brother) saying 'Land Ahoy' or 'Marooner'.
If Big Brother-or Big Beard - raises signs that read 'land ahoy' or 'marooner' the lookouts must raise the alarm and have all housemates on deck within five minutes.
than GAMES WITH GOLD | Marooners RUN, jump, and slap your way to victory in this hectic party game which sees you able to pester your friends in local and online co-op.
Also, I cannot imagine Kambon's pragmatism being endorsed by the Nilotic ancestors as they taught in the Mystery Education System and, closer to home, the likes of marooners Mary McCleod Bethune, Marva Collins, Barbara Sizemore, Chancellor Williams, E.