marquis


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Related to marquis: Marquis de Sade, dictionary

mar·quis

n. (mär-kē′)
1. pl. mar·quis (-kēz′)
a. A nobleman ranking below a duke and above an earl or a count.
b. Used as a title for such a nobleman.
2. pl. mar·quis·es (-kwĭ-sĭz) (mär′kwĭs) Variant of marquess.

[Partly from French marquis and partly from Middle English marques, both from Old French marquis, marchis, from marche, border country, of Germanic origin; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

marquis

(ˈmɑːkwɪs; mɑːˈkiː; French marki)
n, pl -quises or -quis
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in various countries) a nobleman ranking above a count, corresponding to a British marquess. The title of marquis is often used in place of that of marquess
[C14: from Old French marchis, literally: count of the march, from marche march2]

Marquis

(ˈmɑːkwɪs)
n
(Biography) Don(ald Robert Perry). 1878–1937, US humorist; author of archy and mehitabel (1927)

mar•quis

(ˈmɑr kwɪs, mɑrˈki)

n., pl. -quis•es, -quis (-ˈkiz)
a European nobleman ranking below a duke and above a count.
[1250–1300; < Middle French < Italian marchese < Medieval Latin *(comēs) marc(h)ēnsis (count) of a borderland. See march2, -ese]
mar′quis•ate (-kwə zɪt) n.

Mar•quis

(ˈmɑr kwɪs)

n.
Don(ald Robert Perry), 1878–1937, U.S. humorist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marquis - humorist who wrote about the imaginary life of cockroaches (1878-1937)
2.marquis - nobleman (in various countries) ranking above a countmarquis - nobleman (in various countries) ranking above a count
noble, nobleman, Lord - a titled peer of the realm
Translations

marquis

marquess [ˈmɑːkwɪs] nmarchese m
References in classic literature ?
"Are you aware, marquis," said the jeering soldier, "that we still have six miles to go?
"Good heavens!" cried the marquis, "go to Cassan if you must, but you'll go alone.
"Pardon, Monsieur the Marquis!" said a ragged and submissive man, "it is a child."
As the tall man suddenly got up from the ground, and came running at the carriage, Monsieur the Marquis clapped his hand for an instant on his sword-hilt.
Three days after his introduction to the family of Madame de Cintre, Newman, coming in toward evening, found upon his table the card of the Marquis de Bellegarde.
Finding, then, that, in fact he could not move, he thought himself of having recourse to his usual remedy, which was to think of some passage in his books, and his craze brought to his mind that about Baldwin and the Marquis of Mantua, when Carloto left him wounded on the mountain side, a story known by heart by the children, not forgotten by the young men, and lauded and even believed by the old folk; and for all that not a whit truer than the miracles of Mahomet.
It was also said that she was some relation to the Marquis, but only a distant one a cousin, or cousin-german, or something of the sort.
"Bravo, Villefort!" cried the marquis; "excellently well said!
This transition costume, uniting as it did two centuries, was worn by the chevalier with the high-bred grace of an old French marquis, the secret of which is lost to France since the day when Fleury, Mole's last pupil, vanished.
Let us go on, if you please." And disengaging his sword with a sinister clashing of the blade, the duke wounded the marquis in the breast.
"By the by, the Marquis of Villarel is here for a time.
It was there that Egalite Orleans roasted partridges on the night when he and the Marquis of Steyne won a hundred thousand from a great personage at ombre.

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