marquise


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mar·quise

(mär-kēz′)
n.
1.
a. The wife or widow of a marquis.
b. See marchioness.
2. Used as a title for a marquise.
3. See marquee.
4.
a. A finger ring set with a pointed oval stone or cluster of pointed oval stones.
b. A pointed oval shape of a gem.

[French , feminine of marquis, marquis (French marquise often being used in French attributively to describe things considered splendid and elegant); see marquis.]

marquise

(mɑːˈkiːz; French markiz)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in various countries) another word for marchioness
2. (Jewellery)
a. a gemstone, esp a diamond, cut in a pointed oval shape and usually faceted
b. a piece of jewellery, esp a ring, set with such a stone or with an oval cluster of stones
3. (Architecture) another name for marquee2
[C18: from French, feminine of marquis]

mar•quise

(mɑrˈkiz)

n., pl. -quis•es.
1. the wife or widow of a marquis.
2. a woman holding a rank equal to that of a marquis.
3.
a. Also called marquise′ cut`. a gem cut, esp. for a diamond, yielding a low pointed oval usu. with 58 facets.
Compare brilliant cut, emerald cut.
b. a gem cut in this style.
[1700–10; < French: feminine of marquis marquis; (definition 4) < French marquise orig., a canopy over a tent]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marquise - a noblewoman ranking below a duchess and above a countessmarquise - a noblewoman ranking below a duchess and above a countess
noblewoman, peeress, Lady - a woman of the peerage in Britain
2.marquise - permanent canopy over an entrance of a hotel etc.marquise - permanent canopy over an entrance of a hotel etc.
canopy - a covering (usually of cloth) that serves as a roof to shelter an area from the weather
References in classic literature ?
And since it is not you, marquise, since it cannot be you, deuce take the rest
said the marquise, with a slight bitterness of expression; "and how evident it is that you fear the least suspicion of your amours to escape.
Ah," said the Marquise de Saint-Meran, a woman with a stern, forbidding eye, though still noble and distinguished in appearance, despite her fifty years -- "ah, these revolutionists, who have driven us from those very possessions they afterwards purchased for a mere trifle during the Reign of Terror, would be compelled to own, were they here, that all true devotion was on our side, since we were content to follow the fortunes of a falling monarch, while they, on the contrary, made their fortune by worshipping the rising sun; yes, yes, they could not help admitting that the king, for whom we sacrificed rank, wealth, and station was truly our `Louis the well-beloved,' while their wretched usurper his been, and ever will be, to them their evil genius, their `Napoleon the accursed.
If the marquise will deign to repeat the words I but imperfectly caught, I shall be delighted to answer," said M.
This conversation took place in the evening, and half an hour later Valentin ushered his companion into an apartment of the house of the Rue de l'Universite into which he had not yet penetrated, the salon of the dowager Marquise de Bellegarde.
Dolly took Tanya and Grisha to a children's ball at the Sarmatskys': Tanya was a French marquise.
s death, Delphine de Nucingen, Madame de Listomere, the Marquise d'Espard, and your dear Firmiani; I have had her invited to give you her support in case the other women attempt to black-ball you.
Thus the captain touchingly recounted the story of his love for a fascinating marquise of thirty-five and at the same time for a charming, innocent child of seventeen, daughter of the bewitching marquise.
In the vast dimness of the curtained drawing-room, the little man, resembling a black bolster, leaned towards a couch, his hat on his knees, and gesticulated with a fat hand at the elongated, gracefully-flowing lines of the clear Parisian toilette from which the half-amused, half-bored marquise listened with gracious languor.
Rawdon Crawley in powder and patches, the most ravissante little Marquise in the world.
But as to counts, marquises, dukes, earls, and the like, I was not so scrupulous.
I believe you, it will, and that in the highest degree; - for you see my friend Moliere is of all known tailors the man who best clothes our barons, comtes, and marquises - according to their measure.