marsh elder


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marsh elder

n.
Any of several North American herbs or shrubs of the genus Iva of the composite family, often growing in salt marshes and having nodding, greenish flower heads.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

marsh elder

n
(Plants) any of several North American shrubs of the genus Iva, growing in salt marshes: family Asteraceae (composites). Compare elder2
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

marsh′ el`der


n.
any of various composite plants of the genus Iva that grow in salt marshes.
[1745–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marsh elder - any of various coarse shrubby plants of the genus Iva with small greenish flowersmarsh elder - any of various coarse shrubby plants of the genus Iva with small greenish flowers; common in moist areas (as coastal salt marshes) of eastern and central North America
genus Iva - small genus of American herbs or shrubs; in some classifications placed in a separate family Ambrosiaceae
burweed marsh elder, false ragweed, Iva xanthifolia - tall annual marsh elder common in moist rich soil in central North America that can cause contact dermatitis; produces much pollen that is a major cause of hay fever
bog plant, marsh plant, swamp plant - a semiaquatic plant that grows in soft wet land; most are monocots: sedge, sphagnum, grasses, cattails, etc; possibly heath
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
By the Late Archaic Period (5,000-3,000 years ago) natives began supplementing their diet with cultivated plant foods like sumpweed (marsh elder), squash and sunflower.
The research indicates that the Riverton people likely ate sunflower, marsh elder, two types of chenopod-a family that includes spinach and beets-and possibly squash and little barley, according to the findings.
The high intertidal zone is dominated by the Marsh Elder shrub, Iva frutescens L., which is dense and tall, forming an [approximately]90% canopy cover over the other plant species in this zone (hereafter called "tall Iva").