marxisant

marxisant

(marksizã)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics sympathetic to Marxism
References in periodicals archive ?
The strains of Marxist and marxisant thought that have most influenced the field have not been ones in which colonialism figures as a concept relevant to the analysis of some advanced capitalist societies.
With the election of Donald Trump, her Marxisant publisher Zero Books recognized that this research was onto something big, and rushed to get this book out.
It thus appears as if Malai's ideological position as a liberal is defined in large part by the things that he did not do: adopt Marxisant vocabulary, behave rudely, and join the so-called peace revolt (kabot santiphap) in 1952.
Yet, ironically, on one matter Haimson was the closest to Karpovich: as an organizer of a community, in this case not the Russian emigre community in the United States but an international community of marxisant scholars.
"Francis serves an environmentalist mindset that, unlike the traditional ethos of conservation, views man as a parasite (Western man in Francis' marxisant variant) and understands wealth in pre-modern terms as a zero-sum game," she wrote.
256), and that "Critical Political Economy of Communications" is critical in the sense of being "broadly marxisant" (Murdock & Golding, 2005, p.
Raymond Aron remains doggedly attached to an at first unfashionable pragmatic liberalism, casting a sceptical and even amused eye on the 'opium' of marxisant intellectuals.
Social relations, in fact, where they have been treated, have mostly been the focus of scholars influenced by Marxist or at least marxisant ideologies and class struggle has been the ideological umbrella under which they have sheltered (14).
She studied with Marxisant academics such as Franz Neumann and Herbert Marcuse.
'Modernity' is a flatly descriptive word, whereas 'modernism', as it is used throughout the book, has an ideological charge (marxisant or feminist on the part of some contributors).
Sharing the unease of some Marxisant analysts looking at the university as a site of class struggle, she can chart possibilities of class-based transformation only by turning academics into workers (Lewins 2007:1) or into agents in a historically segmented academic labour market (Lewins 2007:188, see also Bezuidenhout et al 2008:14) and by declaring the work of administrative, managerial, library, laboratory, service staff to be core to the overall functioning of universities.
These may be seen (to adopt a somewhat marxisant terminology) as set on a gradient from the more superstructural features to the more basal ones, and in this volume the first of these gets the most attention and the last the least.