masculine ending


Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to masculine ending: masculine rhyme, feminine ending

masculine ending

n.
1. A stressed syllable that ends a line of verse.
2. Grammar A final syllable or termination that marks or forms words in the masculine gender.

masculine ending

n
(Poetry) prosody a stressed syllable at the end of a line of verse. Compare feminine ending
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, the combination of a feminine and a masculine ending of two unrhymed lines renders them less similar, and therefore even more tightly grouped together and more dependent on the whole.
Thus, for instance, Clive Scott describes feminine rhymes as "evanescent, yielding, reverberant" as opposed to masculine rhymes, which are "abrupt, unrelenting, circumscribed." Consider, however, the last rhyme words of Excerpts 7 and 5, "Meandrins" and "fantasques." Their endings are contrasted in two significant respects: "Meandrins" has a masculine ending with a continuous, reverberating nasal vowel; whereas the ending of "fantasques" is feminine, and its last consonant is an abrupt, voiceless stop.
But the psychological atmosphere of patent purpose and definite direction inherent in the masculine ending may bring out of the last line a dormant punchline quality, as text written in lemon juice may be made visible by heating.
Note this too: when we confront "Meandrins" with "choisi" or "charite," for instance, all three have masculine endings, but the nasal vowel in the former is much more reverberant than the oral [i] or [e] in the latter two, even though they too are continuous, periodic speech sounds.
Da, browska also found that 78% of two-and-a-half-year-olds were productive with -a, the more frequent masculine ending, and 22% were also productive with -u, where "productivity" was defined as the ability to inflect at least one nonce word out of eight.
The analysis revealed no significant effects of referent (p = 0.796) or age (p = 0.070) and no interaction (p = 0.095), which suggests that respondents were not sensitive to the relationship between the meaning of the noun and the choice of genitive masculine ending. Thus, this part of the experiment replicated the results obtained by Dabrowska (2005) and showed that the same conclusions also obtain for older participants (fourteen- and eighteen-year-olds).
(4) It should be noted in this connection that there is no one "correct" generalization about the genitive masculine ending. Learners could note that most masculine nouns take -a and extend this ending to all new masculines; they could note that most inanimate masculine nouns take -u and consistently use this ending; they could observe that there are certain phonological regularities and exploit those; or they could use both endings probabilistically.
Eighty Polish children and adolescents aged from 6 to 18 participated in a nonce word inflection experiment testing their productivity with the two genitive masculine endings, -a and -u, and their sensitivity to the distributional and semantic factors determining the choice of ending.
The distribution of the two masculine endings, -a and -u, is determined partly by semantic factors, in that nearly all animate masculines take -a.
While masculine nouns normally have masculine plural endings and feminine nouns normally have feminine plurals endings, "fathers" has a feminine ending and "women" has a masculine ending. Clothing, however, whether worn by a male or a female, is always feminine, as is the Spirit of God.
Furthermore, for Psalm 119 Freedman counts the number of second-person masculine singular suffixes, the second-person singular masculine ending on [[blank].sup.*]qatal forms and the one instance of "we" in verse 41, which balance rather closely in the two halves of the poem (around fourteen hundred times in each half).