masculinist


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Related to masculinist: Masculinism

masculinist

(ˈmæskjʊlɪnɪst) or

masculist

n
an advocate of the rights of men
adj
of, characterized by, or relating to men's rights
Translations

masculinist

[ˈmæskjʊlɪnɪst] ADJmasculino

masculinist

adjmaskulinistisch
References in periodicals archive ?
"In feminist cyberpunk, the hero seldom stands alone" (60), writes Lavigne in chapter three, "Alienating Worlds: Globalization and Community." The same can be said for cyberpunk women's writing too: it does not stand alone from the first-wave of masculinist cyberpunk that came before it, which Lavigne very clearly illustrates throughout her critical study.
The voices of 28 mothers working as full-time faculty members at US universities offer perspectives on the masculinist bias in the field of education, combining motherhood and intellect, and humanizing education in male-centric schools.
As such, we focus on three core themes: women's antiracist interventions into discussions of the problems of the Occupy rhetoric; women's interventions into the masculinist space of Occupy; and women's embodied political protest.
masculinist) practice and theory of economics were constructed to exclude, discount and dismiss the underpaid and unpaid work of the world's women.
With this understanding, the increase of masculinist representations could be viewed as negotiating or reconfiguring masculinity in post-authoritarian times.
According to Fallon, in sub-Saharan Africa women's political movements are shaped by unique gendered and political structures, such as past experience participating in informal politics and women's groups, particularly prior to colonization, as well as contending with masculinist government structures and authoritarian regimes that emerged during colonization and early independence.
I build on [previous critiques] by suggesting that the turn toward masculinist ideology was also a conspicuously contested feature of the Black Power era.
Du Bois and his contemporaries reasoned that white supremacy was primarily at fault, but now in the twenty-first century we evaluate the juxtaposition of gendered and sexualized notions of difference implicit in Du Bois's position as "prophet." Consider, for instance, Du Bois's antiracist, anti-imperialist activism exemplified in Darkwater (1920): "The uplift of women is, next to the problem of the color line and the peace movement, our greatest modern cause." The "women and color" movements have "a deep meaning" because a Du Boisian black masculinist (heterosexual) stance appears predominant.
Current masculinist culture dictates there be winners and losers.
The author points out, for example, the masculinist bias of the theorists in the opening survey.
(There is, of course, a precedent for this principle in the Pattern and Decoration art of the '70s, on which Perrone has written extensively.) You might even find a kind of sly feminization of formalism's rather masculinist body of thought in Perrone's art of sewing on buttons.
Shakespeare in effect equates these two key transactional moments of a masculinist ideology of possession" (59).