hypertension

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hy·per·ten·sion

 (hī′pər-tĕn′shən)
n.
1.
a. Abnormally elevated arterial blood pressure.
b. Arterial disease marked by chronic high blood pressure.
2. Elevated pressure or tension of a body fluid, as of the intraocular or cerebrospinal fluids.

hypertension

(ˌhaɪpəˈtɛnʃən)
n
(Pathology) pathol abnormally high blood pressure
hypertensive adj, n

hy•per•ten•sion

(ˌhaɪ pərˈtɛn ʃən)

n.
1.
a. elevation of the blood pressure, esp. the diastolic pressure.
b. an arterial disease characterized by this condition.
2. excessive nervous tension.
[1890–95]

hy·per·ten·sion

(hī′pər-tĕn′shən)

hypertension

High blood pressure, often caused by stress, arteriosclerosis, or heart disease.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypertension - a common disorder in which blood pressure remains abnormally high (a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or greater)hypertension - a common disorder in which blood pressure remains abnormally high (a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or greater)
cardiovascular disease - a disease of the heart or blood vessels
essential hypertension, hyperpiesia, hyperpiesis - persistent and pathological high blood pressure for which no specific cause can be found
malignant hypertension - severe hypertension that runs a rapid course and damages the inner linings of the blood vessels and the heart and spleen and kidneys and brain; "malignant hypertension is the most lethal form of hypertension"
secondary hypertension - hypertension that is secondary to another disease
white-coat hypertension - temporary rise in blood pressure in the doctor's office
hypotension - abnormally low blood pressure
Translations
hypertenze

hypertension

[ˈhaɪpəˈtenʃən] N (Med) → hipertensión f

hypertension

[ˌhaɪpərˈtɛnʃən] nhypertension f

hypertension

[ˌhaɪpəˈtɛnʃn] n (Med) → ipertensione f

hy·per·ten·sion

n. hipertensión, presión arterial alta;
benign ______ benigna;
essential ______ esencial;
malignant ______ maligna;
portal ______ portal;
primary ______ primaria;
renal ______ renal.

hypertension

n hipertensión f, presión alta (de la sangre) (fam); benign intracranial — hipertensión intracraneal benigna; essential — hipertensión esencial; malignant — hipertensión maligna; portal — hipertensión portal; pulmonary — hipertensión pulmonar; renovascular — hipertensión renovascular; white-coat — hipertensión de bata blanca
References in periodicals archive ?
It has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs, and its use is also recommended for white-coat or masked hypertension [1].
Ambulatory blood pressure monitors is anticipated to be the fastest growing segment in the device type segment, due to the effective use in the the diagnosis of white-coat hypertension and masked hypertension.
A Masked hypertension is hypertension that is not apparent during visits to a doctor's office, yet raises risk for stroke, heart disease, or damage to the brain and other organs.
Prevalence, persistence, and clinical significance of masked hypertension in youth.
If you have risk factors for high blood pressure, such as advancing age, diabetes, obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and a family history of hypertension, you should discuss the option of 24-hour blood pressure monitoring if you've already demonstrated what may be masked hypertension in your doctors office.
Recently and concurring with the economic crisis, we have noticed an increased prevalence of a hypertension model, that is working pressure, which behaves as masked hypertension in activity and shows very marked dipper pattern [14].
Masked hypertension has been shown to be rather more frequent in obese than in normal-weight individuals (Pickering et al 2003).
He also referred to white coat hypertension and masked hypertension.
Masked hypertension is commonly defined as the presence of a normal office BP (< 140/90mmHg) with an elevated awake mean BP on ABPM ([greater than or equal to] 135/85mmHg).
22 ( ANI ): Researchers have found that patients with masked hypertension, or normal BP in clinic but elevated BP when measured at home, had an increased risk of death and cardiovascular events compared with those who had normal BP in both clinic and at home.