masonry

(redirected from masonwork)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ma·son·ry

 (mā′sən-rē)
n. pl. ma·son·ries
1.
a. The trade of a mason.
b. Work done by a mason.
c. Stonework or brickwork.
2. Masonry Freemasonry.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

masonry

(ˈmeɪsənrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Building) the craft of a mason
2. (Building) work that is built by a mason; stonework or brickwork
3. (often capital) short for Freemasonry
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ma•son•ry

(ˈmeɪ sən ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. work constructed by a mason, esp. stonework.
2. the craft or occupation of a mason.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.masonry - structure built of stone or brick by a masonmasonry - structure built of stone or brick by a mason
brickwork - masonry done with bricks and mortar
dry masonry - masonry without mortar
stonework - masonry done with stone
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
2.masonry - Freemasons collectivelyMasonry - Freemasons collectively    
secret society - a society that conceals its activities from nonmembers
Freemason, Mason - a member of a widespread secret fraternal order pledged to mutual assistance and brotherly love
3.masonry - the craft of a mason
craft, trade - the skilled practice of a practical occupation; "he learned his trade as an apprentice"
bricklaying - the craft of laying bricks
building, construction - the commercial activity involved in repairing old structures or constructing new ones; "their main business is home construction"; "workers in the building trades"
daub, plaster - coat with plaster; "daub the wall"
render - coat with plastic or cement; "render the brick walls in the den"
render-set - cover with two coats of plaster; "render-set the walls so they'll look nice and smooth"
parget - apply ornamental plaster to
mud - plaster with mud
float - make the surface of level or smooth; "float the plaster"
skimcoat - coat with a mixture of gypsum and spackle; "he skimcoated the drywall"
mortar - plaster with mortar; "mortar the wall"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بِناء
zdivozednictví
murværk
falazat
múrhleîsla, steinhleîsla; múrverk
murivo
taş duvarcılıktaş işi

masonry

[ˈmeɪsnrɪ] N
1. (= building trade) → albañilería f
2. (= stonework) → mampostería f
3. (= rubble) → escombros mpl
4. (= freemasonry) → masonería f, francmasonería f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

masonry

[ˈmeɪsənri] nmaçonnerie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

masonry

n
(= stonework)Mauerwerk nt
(= free masonry)Freimaurerei f, → Freimaurertum nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

masonry

[ˈmeɪsnrɪ] n
a. (stonework) → muratura; (skill) → arte f muratoria
b. (also freemasonry) → massoneria
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mason

(ˈmeisn) noun
(usually ˈstonemason) a skilled worker or builder in stone.
ˈmasonry noun
stone(work). He was killed by falling masonry.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The wall, by the touch, was of fine hewn stone; the steps too, though somewhat steep and narrow, were of polished masonwork, and regular and solid underfoot.
Solid, stony presences with roughly pitted surfaces that suggest hours of laborious masonwork, these partially blackened idols arc mostly made of cork, pointing to an unexpected fragility: Were these monoliths to tip over, they would crumble.