mass-energy


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Related to mass-energy: E=mc2

mass-energy

n
(General Physics) mass and energy considered as equivalent and interconvertible, according to the theory of relativity
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They thereafter delve deeper into the meta-physics of their mass-energy relationship.
He developed the theory of relativity, and is best known to the general public for "the world's most famous equation," his mass-energy equivalence formula, E=mc2.
It is a power that goes beyond the mass-energy equivalence seen in physics, which led to Albert Einstein's classic theory of E=mc2.
All of the atoms in the stars, galaxies and planets in existence make up roughly 5 percent of the mass-energy density of the cosmos.
Given its unique properties, the theoretical particle is also considered a candidate - among several others - for being the source of dark matter, which makes up 27 percent of the universe's total observable mass-energy and 85 percent of all observable mass.
The boson mass is compared with that of mass-energy in units of [m.sub.e][c.sup.2], provided that v [right arrow] c (here the boson mass can be considered as the mass of the excited or "associated" vacuum).
The prevailing standard model of cosmology indicates that total mass-energy of the universal contains 4.9 percent ordinary matter, 26.8 percent dark matter and 68.3 percent dark energy.
His 1905 E=mc2 theorem dealing with mass-energy equivalence has been called the world's most famous equation and he once said: "It should be possible to explain the laws of physics to a barmaid." His theory of relativity explains that what we perceive as the force of gravity in fact arises from the curvature of space and time.
Neglecting the real width of the mass-energy distribution affects Einstein's equations by introducing a surface of discontinuity in the background spacetime.
An unknown form of energy, so-called "dark energy," appears to uniformly fill the universe, accounting for about 70 percent of its mass-energy content and apparently causing its acceleration.
Their calculations also neglected bremsstrahlung, assumed 34 eV per ion pair created in air, and the mass-energy absorption coefficients for air were obtained from (4).
By the latest calculations, about 4.6 percent of the total mass-energy is ordinary matter, which comes to a little less than 17 percent of the total amount of matter.--Tom Siegfried