mass-energy equivalence


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to mass-energy equivalence: E=mc2

mass-en·er·gy equivalence

(măs′ĕn′ər-jē)
n.
The physical principle that a measured quantity of energy is equivalent to a measured quantity of mass. The equivalence is expressed by Einstein's equation E = mc2, where E represents energy, m the equivalent mass, and c the speed of light.

mass-energy equivalence

The principle that mass and energy can be converted into each other and that a particular quantity of mass is equivalent to a particular quantity of energy. The principle was stated mathematically by Albert Einstein as E = mc2, where E is the energy in ergs, m is the mass in grams, and c is the speed of light in centimeters per second.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mass-energy equivalence - (physics) the principle that a measured quantity of mass is equivalent (according to relativity theory) to a measured quantity of energymass-energy equivalence - (physics) the principle that a measured quantity of mass is equivalent (according to relativity theory) to a measured quantity of energy
principle, rule - a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
References in periodicals archive ?
He developed the theory of relativity, and is best known to the general public for "the world's most famous equation," his mass-energy equivalence formula, E=mc2.
It is a power that goes beyond the mass-energy equivalence seen in physics, which led to Albert Einstein's classic theory of E=mc2.
Some of his other contributions to the world of physics - especially the mass-energy equivalence formula E=mc2 - are indispensable to aspiring scientists of our generation.
The gravitational redshift from mass-energy equivalence, which stems from special relativity, is derived as follows.
His 1905 E=mc2 theorem dealing with mass-energy equivalence has been called the world's most famous equation and he once said: "It should be possible to explain the laws of physics to a barmaid." His theory of relativity explains that what we perceive as the force of gravity in fact arises from the curvature of space and time.
For example, he said: "We should take care not to make intellect our god; it has, of course, powerful muscles, but no personality." The man best known for his mass-energy equivalence formula and his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect, said what many people who spend all day living the creativity of advertising have never even thought of, let alone practice.