mast


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Related to mast: Mast cells

mast 1

 (măst)
n.
1. Nautical
a. A vertical structure consisting of a spar or several spars affixed end-to-end, rising from the keel or deck of a sailing vessel to support the sails.
b. A single spar serving as a part of such a structure: the fore topgallant mast.
2.
a. A vertical pole.
b. A tall vertical antenna, as for a radio.
3. A captain's mast.

[Middle English, from Old English mæst.]

mast 2

 (măst)
n.
The nuts of forest trees accumulated on the ground, especially considered as a food source for wildlife or for domestic swine.

[Middle English, from Old English mæst.]

mast

(mɑːst)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical any vertical spar for supporting sails, rigging, flags, etc, above the deck of a vessel or any components of such a composite spar
2. any sturdy upright pole used as a support
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical Also called: captain's mast a hearing conducted by the captain of a vessel into minor offences of the crew
4. (Nautical Terms) before the mast nautical as an apprentice seaman
vb
(Nautical Terms) (tr) nautical to equip with a mast or masts
[Old English mæst; related to Middle Dutch mast and Latin mālus pole]
ˈmastless adj
ˈmastˌlike adj

mast

(mɑːst)
n
(Plants) the fruit of forest trees, such as beech, oak, etc, used as food for pigs
[Old English mæst; related to Old High German mast food, and perhaps to meat]

mast1

(mæst, mɑst)

n.
1. a spar or structure rising above the hull and upper portions of a ship to hold sails, spars, rigging, etc.
2. any upright pole, as a support for an aerial, a post in certain cranes, etc.
v.t.
4. to provide with a mast.
5. before the mast, as a seagoing sailor.
[before 900; Old English mæst; Old High German mast, Old Norse mastr; akin to Latin mālus pole]

mast2

(mæst, mɑst)

n.
the nuts of forest trees, as oak and beech, used as food, esp. for hogs.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English mæst; akin to meat]

mast


Past participle: masted
Gerund: masting

Imperative
mast
mast
Present
I mast
you mast
he/she/it masts
we mast
you mast
they mast
Preterite
I masted
you masted
he/she/it masted
we masted
you masted
they masted
Present Continuous
I am masting
you are masting
he/she/it is masting
we are masting
you are masting
they are masting
Present Perfect
I have masted
you have masted
he/she/it has masted
we have masted
you have masted
they have masted
Past Continuous
I was masting
you were masting
he/she/it was masting
we were masting
you were masting
they were masting
Past Perfect
I had masted
you had masted
he/she/it had masted
we had masted
you had masted
they had masted
Future
I will mast
you will mast
he/she/it will mast
we will mast
you will mast
they will mast
Future Perfect
I will have masted
you will have masted
he/she/it will have masted
we will have masted
you will have masted
they will have masted
Future Continuous
I will be masting
you will be masting
he/she/it will be masting
we will be masting
you will be masting
they will be masting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been masting
you have been masting
he/she/it has been masting
we have been masting
you have been masting
they have been masting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been masting
you will have been masting
he/she/it will have been masting
we will have been masting
you will have been masting
they will have been masting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been masting
you had been masting
he/she/it had been masting
we had been masting
you had been masting
they had been masting
Conditional
I would mast
you would mast
he/she/it would mast
we would mast
you would mast
they would mast
Past Conditional
I would have masted
you would have masted
he/she/it would have masted
we would have masted
you would have masted
they would have masted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.MAST - a vertical spar for supporting sailsmast - a vertical spar for supporting sails
foremast - the mast nearest the bow in vessels with two or more masts
jiggermast, jigger - any small mast on a sailing vessel; especially the mizzenmast of a yawl
jury mast - a temporary mast to replace one that has broken off
mainmast - the chief mast of a sailing vessel with two or more masts
masthead - the head or top of a mast
mizen, mizenmast, mizzen, mizzenmast - third mast from the bow in a vessel having three or more masts; the after and shorter mast of a yawl, ketch, or dandy
sailing ship, sailing vessel - a vessel that is powered by the wind; often having several masts
spar - a stout rounded pole of wood or metal used to support rigging
topmast - the mast next above a lower mast and topmost in a fore-and-aft rig
2.MAST - nuts of forest trees (as beechnuts and acorns) accumulated on the groundmast - nuts of forest trees (as beechnuts and acorns) accumulated on the ground
nut - usually large hard-shelled seed
3.mast - nuts of forest trees used as feed for swine
feed, provender - food for domestic livestock
4.mast - any sturdy upright pole
pole - a long (usually round) rod of wood or metal or plastic

mast

noun
1. flagpole, support, post, pole, upright the slapping of the flag on the short mast
2. aerial, transmitter, pylon the closed circuit television mast
Translations
ساريَه، صارٍصَارُ
stěžeňstožár
mast
masto
masto
jarbol
árboc
mastur, siglutré
マスト
마스트
malus
-stiebis
masts
mastolden
sťažeň
jambor
mast
เสาเรือ
direkyelken direği
cột buồm

mast

1 [mɑːst] N
1. (Naut) → mástil m, palo m
ten years before the mast (liter) → diez años de servicio como marinero
2. (Rad) → torre f

mast

2 [mɑːst] N (Bot) [of oak] → bellota f; [of beech] → hayuco m

mast

[ˈmɑːst] n
[ship] → mât m
(RADIO, TV)pylône m

mast

1
n (Naut) → Mast(baum) m; (Rad etc) → Sendeturm m; 10 years before the mast10 Jahre auf See

mast

2
n (Bot) → Mast f

mast

[mɑːst] n (Naut) → albero; (flagpole) → asta (Radio, TV) → pilone m (a traliccio)

mast

(maːst) noun
a long upright pole especially for carrying the sails of a ship, an aerial, flag etc. The sailor climbed the mast.
-masted
having (a certain number of) masts. single-masted; four-masted.

MAST

صَارُ stožár mast Mast κατάρτι mástil masto mât jarbol albero マスト 마스트 mast mast maszt mastro мачта mast เสาเรือ direk cột buồm 桅杆

MAST

V. military anti-shock trousers.
References in classic literature ?
If there had been one mast standing, something high up to which to fasten blocks and tackles
Why, nothing else than put the masts back into the Ghost and sail away.
Therefore pass these Sirens by, and stop your men's ears with wax that none of them may hear; but if you like you can listen yourself, for you may get the men to bind you as you stand upright on a cross piece half way up the mast, {99} and they must lash the rope's ends to the mast itself, that you may have the pleasure of listening.
Therefore, take me and bind me to the crosspiece half way up the mast; bind me as I stand upright, with a bond so fast that I cannot possibly break away, and lash the rope's ends to the mast itself.
A high mast was fixed on the frame, held firmly by metallic lashings, to which was attached a large brigantine sail.
But the breeze, far from lessening its force, blew as if to bend the mast, which, however, the metallic lashings held firmly.
32-54) When he had said this, he had mast and sail hoisted on the ship, and the wind filled the sail and the crew hauled taut the sheets on either side.
Had you heard it from aboard the Argo, you would have declared it to be the sirens singing, and it would have been found necessary to lash you to the mast.
The tall masts holding aloft the white canvas, spread out like a snare for catching the invisible power of the air, emerge gradually from the water, sail after sail, yard after yard, growing big, till, under the towering structure of her machinery, you perceive the insignificant, tiny speck of her hull.
Tell me, when this same Pequod here had her three masts overboard in that typhoon on Japan, that same voyage when thou went mate with Captain Ahab, did'st thou not think of Death and the Judgment then?
The masts and spars, therefore, being linked to the wreck by the shrouds and the rigging, remained alongside for four days.
With rope-ladders learned I to reach many a window, with nimble legs did I climb high masts: to sit on high masts of perception seemed to me no small bliss;--