mastectomy

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Related to mastectomies: total mastectomy

mas·tec·to·my

 (mă-stĕk′tə-mē)
n. pl. mas·tec·to·mies
Surgical removal of all or part of a breast, sometimes including excision of the underlying pectoral muscles, associated skin, and regional lymph nodes, usually performed as a treatment for cancer.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mastectomy

(mæˈstɛktəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
(Surgery) the surgical removal of a breast
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mas•tec•to•my

(mæˈstɛk tə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
the surgical removal of all or part of the breast or mamma.
[1920–25; < Greek mast(ós) breast]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mastectomy


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Surgery to remove a breast.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mastectomy - surgical removal of a breast to remove a malignant tumormastectomy - surgical removal of a breast to remove a malignant tumor
ablation, cutting out, extirpation, excision - surgical removal of a body part or tissue
modified radical mastectomy - removal of a breast and the pectoralis minor and some lymph nodes in the adjacent armpit
radical mastectomy - removal of a breast and the underlying muscles (pectoralis major and pectoralis minor) and lymph nodes in the adjacent armpit
simple mastectomy - removal of a breast leaving the underlying muscles and the lymph nodes intact
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
mastectomia

mastectomy

[mæˈstektəmɪ] N (Med) → mastectomía f
she had to have a mastectomytuvieron que hacerle una mastectomía
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mastectomy

[mæˈstɛktəmi] nmastectomie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mastectomy

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mastectomy

[ˌmæsˈtɛktəmɪ] nmastectomia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mas·tec·to·my

n. mastectomía. V.: mammectomy
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mastectomy

n (pl -mies) mastectomía; modified radical — mastectomía radical modificada
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
No discrepancy of the PR results (0 of 95) was found between the biopsies and their corresponding mastectomies. Comparison of HER2/neu results was available on 77 pairs of cases only (by immunohistochemistry and/or in situ hybridization) and they showed 100% concordance (Table 2).
Tan Yah Yuen, breast surgeon at Mount Elizabeth Hospitals in Singapore, answers questions on mastectomies.
A Survey of the body image of mastectomies women referring to Imam Khomeini and Imam Hussein hospitals in Tehran, Iran.
Parameter Estimates, Standard Errors and p-Values from Segmented Regression Model Predicting Bi-Monthly Rates of Risk-Reducing Mastectomies among Female Residents in New York State and New South Wales, 2009-2014.
Prophylactic mastectomies have become more frequent [1,2], and there are several possible reasons for this.
In a different context, the ratio of reconstructions to mastectomies went from 24-to-100 in 2009 to 40-to-100 in 2014, the AHRQ reported in a Statistical Brief.
Christina Applegate and Angelina Jolie opted for full mastectomies after testing positive for a BRCA gene mutation.
Even though breast cancer rates have remained stable, the rate of single and double mastectomies increased 36 percent between 2005 and 2013, according to a new data brief from the U.S.
A study of 149 consecutive mastectomies using a serial subgross and correlated radiographic technique.
An increasing number of women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer are having lumpectomies, surgeries that remove the cancerous tissue but preserve the breast, rather than mastectomies, in which the entire breast is removed, according to findings published online June 17, 2015 in JAMA Surgery.