mastectomy


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Related to mastectomy: radical mastectomy

mas·tec·to·my

 (mă-stĕk′tə-mē)
n. pl. mas·tec·to·mies
Surgical removal of all or part of a breast, sometimes including excision of the underlying pectoral muscles, associated skin, and regional lymph nodes, usually performed as a treatment for cancer.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mastectomy

(mæˈstɛktəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
(Surgery) the surgical removal of a breast
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mas•tec•to•my

(mæˈstɛk tə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
the surgical removal of all or part of the breast or mamma.
[1920–25; < Greek mast(ós) breast]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mastectomy


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Surgery to remove a breast.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mastectomy - surgical removal of a breast to remove a malignant tumormastectomy - surgical removal of a breast to remove a malignant tumor
ablation, cutting out, extirpation, excision - surgical removal of a body part or tissue
modified radical mastectomy - removal of a breast and the pectoralis minor and some lymph nodes in the adjacent armpit
radical mastectomy - removal of a breast and the underlying muscles (pectoralis major and pectoralis minor) and lymph nodes in the adjacent armpit
simple mastectomy - removal of a breast leaving the underlying muscles and the lymph nodes intact
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
mastectomia

mastectomy

[mæˈstektəmɪ] N (Med) → mastectomía f
she had to have a mastectomytuvieron que hacerle una mastectomía
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mastectomy

[mæˈstɛktəmi] nmastectomie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mastectomy

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mastectomy

[ˌmæsˈtɛktəmɪ] nmastectomia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mas·tec·to·my

n. mastectomía. V.: mammectomy
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mastectomy

n (pl -mies) mastectomía; modified radical — mastectomía radical modificada
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nagah et al2 compared Harmonic Scalpel with the Monopolar Electrocautry in Modified Radical Mastectomy and concluded that the use of harmonic scalpel in MRM shortened the axillary dissection time and caused significant decrease in blood loss and drainage volume and thus lessened overall hospital stay.
For other women, mastectomy (breast removal) is the best option--and a 2017 study indicates that less extensive mastectomy may be just as effective at preventing cancer recurrence as standard mastectomy.
In women with a BRCA1/2 deleterious mutation, contralateral prophylactic mastectomy is expected to improve all-cause mortality [7, 8].
The rate of breast reconstruction surgery for mastectomy increased 62% from 2009 to 2014, while the mastectomy rate itself "remained relatively stable," according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
Summary: Simultaneous reconstructive surgery saves the psychological damage of mastectomy
Although most frequently arising in the radically dissected neck or extremities, these have also been reported in association with mastectomy. There is a paucity of published cases of neuromas in cancer patients after surgery when compared with cases after amputation or surgery for benign conditions.
Caring for patients after mastectomy procedures can be particularly challenging due to the complexities of the pain experienced.
Five to ten percent of patients with operable breast cancer develop a chest wall recurrence within 10 years following mastectomy [1, 2].
The 59-year-old made the announcement in (http://www.people.com/article/rita-wilson-breast-cancer-double-mastectomy-reconstruction) People magazine in April, telling fans that she had secretly elected to undergo a bilateral mastectomy followed by reconstructive surgery.
I read with interest the work of Ismail Jatoi (1) and would like to add some useful information for the surgeons in the decision-making about bilateral prophylactic mastectomy (BPM).