mastodon


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Related to mastodon: American mastodon

mas·to·don

 (măs′tə-dŏn′) also mas·to·dont (-dŏnt′)
n.
Any of several very large, extinct proboscidian mammals of the family Mammutidae of the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene Epochs, resembling elephants but having molar teeth of a different structure.

[New Latin Mastodōn, genus name : Greek mastos, breast, nipple + Greek odōn, tooth (from the nipple-shaped protrusions on the crowns of its molars); see dent- in Indo-European roots.]

mas′to·don′ic adj.

mastodon

(ˈmæstəˌdɒn) or

mastodont

n
1. (Palaeontology) any extinct elephant-like proboscidean mammal of the genus Mammut (or Mastodon), common in Pliocene times
2. (Animals) any extinct elephant-like proboscidean mammal of the genus Mammut (or Mastodon), common in Pliocene times
[C19: from New Latin, literally: breast-tooth, referring to the nipple-shaped projections on the teeth]
ˌmastoˈdontic adj

mas•to•don

(ˈmæs təˌdɒn)

n.
any of numerous extinct elephantlike mammals of the Oligocene through Pleistocene epochs, esp. of the genus Mastodon (formerly Mammut), distinguished from true elephants by their tooth structure. Compare mammoth (def. 1).
[1805–15; < New Latin < Greek mast(ós) breast + -odṓn -toothed]

mas·to·don

(măs′tə-dŏn′)
Any of several extinct mammals similar to elephants and mammoths except in the shape of their molar teeth. Like elephants, mastodons had a pair of long, curved tusks growing from their upper jaw, but they also sometimes had a second pair from the lower jaw. They lived from the Oligocene Epoch to the end of the Ice Age.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mastodon - extinct elephant-like mammal that flourished worldwide from Miocene through Pleistocene timesmastodon - extinct elephant-like mammal that flourished worldwide from Miocene through Pleistocene times; differ from mammoths in the form of the molar teeth
proboscidean, proboscidian - massive herbivorous mammals having tusks and a long trunk
genus Mammut, genus Mastodon, Mammut - extinct type genus of the Mammutidae: mastodons
American mastodon, American mastodont, Mammut americanum - mastodon of North America; in some classifications considered a mammoth rather than a mastodon
Translations

mastodon

[ˈmæstədən] Nmastodonte m

mastodon

nMastodon nt
References in classic literature ?
Fe -- Thistle Beds -- Habits of the Bizcacha -- Little Owl -- Saline Streams -- Level Plain -- Mastodon -- St.
That Himmalehan, salt-sea Mastodon, clothed with such portentousness of unconscious power, that his very panics are more to be dreaded than his most fearless and malicious assaults
I found myself gazing at any straggling scion of this strange race with a riveted fascination, just as one would stare at a living mastodon, or a megatherium that had moved in the grey dawn of creation and seen the wonders of that mysterious world that was before the flood.
When I found in La Plata the tooth of a horse embedded with the remains of Mastodon, Megatherium, Toxodon, and other extinct monsters, which all co-existed with still living shells at a very late geological period, I was filled with astonishment; for seeing that the horse, since its introduction by the Spaniards into South America, has run wild over the whole country and has increased in numbers at an unparalleled rate, I asked myself what could so recently have exterminated the former horse under conditions of life apparently so favourable.
I was with the Philadelphia Institute expedition in the Bad Lands under Professor Cope, hunting mastodon bones, and I overheard him say, his own self, that any plantigrade circumflex vertebrate bacterium that hadn't wings and was uncertain was a reptile.
If you don't think it's lonesome wandering all by yourself through savage, unknown Pellucidar, why, just try it, and you will not wonder that I was glad of the company of this first dog--this living replica of the fierce and now extinct hyaenodon of the outer crust that hunted in savage packs the great elk across the snows of southern France, in the days when the mastodon roamed at will over the broad continent of which the British Isles were then a part, and perchance left his footprints and his bones in the sands of Atlantis as well.
The face of Jim O'Brien, a Mastodon King and old-time comrade, caught his eyes.
Amongst us a simpleton, possessed by the demon of hate or cupidity, who has an enemy to destroy, or some near relation to dispose of, goes straight to the grocer's or druggist's, gives a false name, which leads more easily to his detection than his real one, and under the pretext that the rats prevent him from sleeping, purchases five or six grammes of arsenic -- if he is really a cunning fellow, he goes to five or six different druggists or grocers, and thereby becomes only five or six times more easily traced; -- then, when he has acquired his specific, he administers duly to his enemy, or near kinsman, a dose of arsenic which would make a mammoth or mastodon burst, and which, without rhyme or reason, makes his victim utter groans which alarm the entire neighborhood.
A huge woolly mastodon stood swaying to and fro in the shade of a giant fern--a mighty bull with enormous upcurving tusks.
For in the mere act of penning my thoughts of this Leviathan, they weary me, and make me faint with their out-reaching comprehensiveness of sweep, as if to include the whole circle of the sciences, and all the generations of whales, and men, and mastodons, past, present, and to come, with all the revolving panoramas of empire on earth, and throughout the whole universe, not excluding its suburbs.
As though trained for years in this particular evolution, the green Martians melted like mist into the spacious doorways of the nearby buildings, until, in less than three minutes, the entire cavalcade of chariots, mastodons and mounted warriors was nowhere to be seen.
You don't mean to say you really believe this stuff of his about mammoths and mastodons and great sea sairpents?