mastoid process


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mastoid process

n.
A conical protuberance of the posterior portion of the temporal bone that is situated behind the ear in humans and many other vertebrates and serves as a site of muscle attachment. Also called mastoid bone.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mas′toid proc`ess


n.
a large bony prominence on the base of the skull behind the ear containing air spaces that connect with the middle ear cavity.
[1725–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mastoid process - process of the temporal bone behind the ear at the base of the skullmastoid process - process of the temporal bone behind the ear at the base of the skull
mastoidale - the craniometric point at the lowest point of the mastoid process
os temporale, temporal bone - a thick bone forming the side of the human cranium and encasing the inner ear
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In adult populations of other countries minimal side dissimilarities in the location of the asterion from the root of the zygoma and the tip of mastoid process have been observed.
(1.) Schulter-Ellis FP: Population differences in cellularity of the mastoid process. Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) 1979; 87: 461-465.
Dedicated computed tomography of the temporal bones showed opacification within the mastoid process with destruction of bony mastoid septations consistent with coalescent mastoiditis.
(Q) 0.3 Mental and behavioural disorders (F) 0.3 Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous system (L) 0.3 Pregnancy, childbirth and puerperium (O) 0.2 Diseases of the ear and mastoid process (H60-H95) 0.0 Diseases of the eye and adnexa (H00-H59) 0.0 NOTE: Table made from pie graph.
The mean extracranial distances between the JF and surrounding structures were recorded: i) JF and mastoid process (right: 21.91 mm; left: 21.94 mm); ii) JF and foramen magnum (right: 22.21 mm; left: 22.47 mm); iii) JF and vomer (right: 34.21 mm; left: 33.68 mm); iv) JF and medial pterygoid plate (right: 25.86 mm; left: 24.32 mm); v) JF and lateral pterygoid plate (right: 23.97 mm; left: 22.89 mm); vi) JF and occipital condyles (right: 4.87 mm; left: 4.96 mm) (Table II).
Computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bones revealed opacification of the left mastoid process that appeared to represent either middle ear fluid or soft tissue (figure 1).
INTRODUCTION: Congenital cholesteatoma arises from the embryonic epidermal crest, is a benign Disease with slow progressive growth that destroys neighboring structures, it is considered an epidermal cyst originating from the remnants of squamous keratinized epithelium, the disease may appear in several regions of the temporal bone such as in the middle ear (most frequent site) as well as in the petrous apex, cerebellopontine angle, external acoustic meatus and mastoid process, congenital cholesteatoma of the mastoid process is the rarest form of presentation in the temporal bone, only 2 to 4% of cholesteatoma presenting to pediatric otologist are congenital in origin.
Pneumatization of the mastoid process begins between the last month of gestation and birth, with continued growth well into adolescence.