maternal deprivation


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Translations

maternal deprivation

n (Psych) → Verlust mder Mutter
References in periodicals archive ?
Some articles have detailed the morphometrical changes in the gross anatomical thickness of these cortices [31], but using a protocol of maternal deprivation that is not fully related to the MSDB protocol used in this study.
Animal models of maternal deprivation (MD) are based on the exposure to stress in early postnatal life.
Early postnatal maternal deprivation in rats induces memory deficits in adult life that can be reversed by donepezil and galantamine.
The growth of this field in turn fostered the growth of new areas of research within the deprivation framework, such as maternal deprivation, which analyzed the appropriate role and relationship of mother and child.
After a biographical chapter, he covers maternal deprivation; attachment, anxiety, and internal working models; loss, anger, and grief; the research evidence for attachment theory and personality development; psychoanalysis; the practice of psychotherapy; mental health; and society.
Rosenfeld, "Time course of the effect of maternal deprivation on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the infant rat," Developmental Psychobiology, vol.
The UCLA group used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate that youths who experienced early maternal deprivation, specifically, time in an institution such as an orphanage prior to being adopted, show similar responses to their adoptive mother and to strangers in a brain structure called the amygdala.
In particular Bowlby's concept of maternal deprivation at the time made a lot of mothers feel guilty about their mothering, and the concept was perhaps unduly used in the post-war period as part of a political agenda to get women and mothers back behind the stove and away from the workplace.
(12) With the impact of maternal deprivation on an infant now acknowledged and new understandings about cross-infection, significant reconfiguration of hospitals was implemented.
In Anna Freud's view, maternal deprivation was a far more serious trauma than bombing: "The war acquires comparatively little significance for children so long as it only threatens their lives.
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