maternalism


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ma·ter·nal

 (mə-tûr′nəl)
adj.
1. Relating to or characteristic of a mother or motherhood; motherly: maternal instinct.
2. Inherited from one's mother: a maternal trait.
3. Related through one's mother: my maternal uncle.

[Middle English, from Old French maternel, from Medieval Latin māternālis, from Latin māternus, from māter, mother; see māter- in Indo-European roots.]

ma·ter′nal·ism n.
ma·ter′nal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maternalism - the quality of having or showing the tenderness and warmth and affection of or befitting a mothermaternalism - the quality of having or showing the tenderness and warmth and affection of or befitting a mother; "the girl's motherliness made her invaluable in caring for the children"
parental quality - a quality appropriate to a parent
2.maternalism - motherly care; behavior characteristic of a mother; the practice of acting as a mother does toward her children
care, tending, attention, aid - the work of providing treatment for or attending to someone or something; "no medical care was required"; "the old car needs constant attention"
References in periodicals archive ?
If you want your mother to take care of you, that's maternalism. If you want Uncle Sam to take care of you, that's socialism.
Suvorova also delves into the politics of maternalism adopted by most female political leaders in South Asia and analyzes how it set the ideological basis for their rise to power.
So perhaps Mother's Day should be a broader celebration of maternalism in all its glorious variety, particularly at a time when family dynamics are more diverse than ever - something those currently protesting about the relationship education proposals for primary schools in England are failing to grasp.
So perhaps Mother's Day should be a broader celebration of maternalism in all its glorious variety, particularly at a time when family dynamics are more diverse than ever -- something those currently protesting about the relationship education proposals for primary schools in England are failing to grasp.
Jeremy Davies, from thinktank The Fatherhood Institute, said: "Stay-athome dads are still relatively unusual, and maternalism still pervades UK culture - so it's perhaps not surprising that a small proportion of people feel this way.
Talking about the policies, Collier introduces the concept of "social maternalism", which is a recipe of an active state.
This maternalism, which Dumenil argues was central to all conversations regarding women's war mobilization, complicated any claims women might make on the basis of equal citizenship.
It contends that the Guide literature and programs reflected and contributed to a conservatively modern ideal of imperial and international girlhood by combining an older emphasis on maternalism and domesticity with a focus on bravery, independence, and female masculinity, and promoted a friendly familial idea of international and imperial relations influenced by older ideas about race and class-based hierarchies, while also allowing some girls to adapt and use the movement for their own ends, which were sometimes subversive.
Brian Thorn, From Left to Right: Maternalism and Women's Political Activism in Postwar Canada (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press 2016)
I wished for more analysis about the distinction between maternalism and respectability as a political tactic beyond Progressive Era municipal housekeeping.
At set out in Kelly Hannah Moffat's analysis of early and mid-century penal governance of women prisoners confined to the Mercer Reformatory and the Prison for Women in Ontario, Canada, maternalism has oftentimes operated as a penal logic--a means of discipline and punishment of women prisoners by women reformers (2000).Indeed, throughout the 1960s-1970s Elizabeth Fry volunteers were positioned as experts of women's pathways to crime, constructing the tragic narrative of women damaged by maternal neglect in childhood, and therefore incapable of proper parenting themselves.
Throughout history, child care has been entrenched in discourses of maternalism (Ailwood, 2007; Bown, Sumsion & Press, 2010), emphasising notions of care as the priority for young children.