mathematize

math·e·ma·tize

 (măth′ə-mə-tīz′)
tr.v. math·e·ma·tized, math·e·ma·tiz·ing, math·e·ma·tiz·es
To treat or regard mathematically.

math′e·ma·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mathematize

,

mathematise

,

mathematicize

or

mathematicise

vb
1. (Mathematics) (intr) to reason in a mathematical manner
2. (Mathematics) (tr) to consider or express mathematically
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
matemaattistaamatematisoida
References in periodicals archive ?
Using computer tools to manipulate shapes brings the geometric motions conducted by students to an explicit level of awareness (Clements & Sarama, 2007), and with this awareness, students can further mathematize their actions.
On the contrary, Adam the second "does not mathematize phenomena or conceptualize things" (Soloveitchik, 2006: 21).
This initial exchange and refinement of ideas positioned these two students to mathematize a situation for which they had grasped its significance (Bruner, 1990).
FAHP introduced fuzzy set theory on the basis of AHP, and the characters of which is to mathematize the decision-making thinking process by using less quantitative information.
All students reflected that there is often more than one way to mathematize problem situations.
Kaletsky: I agree that there is a gray area, and the big mistake that economics made for a while was trying to mathematize itself to the point of imitating physics rather than other social or even natural sciences, which are closer to economics.
(2008) concluded that researchers cannot "Mathematize social problems with deep structural roots because such calculations are not likely to unearth historical precursors and ideologically laden processes that constitute them" (p.
Though many are not as quick as Frege to mathematize argument, and convert the natural language into abstract symbolic form that might be studied for logical structure, the call to the study of form seems eternal.
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