matoke


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matoke

(maˈtɔkɛ)
n
(Cookery) (in Uganda) the flesh of bananas, boiled and mashed as a food
[C20: from Luganda]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The raid at Nyangena in Kitutu Chache subcounty was conducted by a multi-agency team led by county deputy police commander Caleb Matoke. Those arrested were a man and two women.
Reporting by Collins Omulo, Benson Amadala, Victor Raballa, Dickens Wasonga, Derick Luvega, Justus Ochieng', George Odiwuor, Benson Ayienda, Josiah Odanga, David Muchui, Gitonga Marete, Alex Njeru, Jacob Walter, Waweru Wairimu, Barnabas Bii, Florah Koech, Evans Kipkura, Tom Matoke, Gerald Bwisa, Dennis Lubanga, Oscar Kakai, Kalume Kazungu and Maureen Ongala
LONDON: A ccording to Alan Westwood, chief executive of Matoke, a company hoping to develop a new form of antibiotic, the issue of antibiotic resistance is one of the most troubling issues of our times.
In Ruhiira, Uganda, an international aid project once offered villagers $300,000 to grow maize instead of matoke, a banana-like starch.
In Uganda, I just love their matoke (cooked green bananas) and vinyewa (groundnut sauce).
About the newcomers to Qatar, he said,"They were happy to meet other people from Uganda." The meal featured a selection of typical Ugandan dishes including matoke and binyobwa (groundnut paste).
Union of Genius uses locally sourced, seasonal ingredients to make fresh soups to recipes including hot beef banana matoke soup, Peruvian quinoa chowder and broccoli, bacon and chili.
[27] Alice Nambiro Wechuli, Geoffrey Muchiri Muketha, Nahason Matoke, "Cyber Security Assessment Framework": Case of Government Ministries in Kenya, International Journal of Technology in Computer Science & Engineering, ISSN 2349-1582, 2014, http://www.ijtcse.com
Matooke, also known as Matoke or Ibitoke is a meal consisting of steamed green banana (similar to a plantain), popular in different parts of Africa.
With incomes of less than US$1.25 a day, they cannot afford to buy much - especially when food prices rise due to poor harvests, as recently happened in Uganda where matoke, cassava flour and bean prices were respectively 125, 70 and 40 percent higher than the previous year.
(19.) Kamau L, Agai D, Matoke D, Wachira L, Gikandi G, Vulule JM.