matriarchate


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ma·tri·ar·chate

 (mā′trē-är′kĭt, -kāt′)

matriarchate

(ˈmeɪtrɪˌɑːkɪt; -keɪt)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) rare a family or people under female domination or government

ma•tri•ar•chy

(ˈmeɪ triˌɑr ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1. a family, society, or state governed by women.
2. a form of social organization in which the mother is head of the family and descent is reckoned in the female line.

matriarchate

1. a matriarchal form of government.
2. a family, tribe, or other social group ruled by a matriarch or matriarchs. — matriarchic, adj.
See also: Women
1. a matriarchal form of government.
2. a family, tribe, or other social group ruled by a matriarch or matriarchs. — matriarchic, adj.
See also: Society
1. a matriarchal form of government.
2. a family, tribe, or other social group ruled by a matriarch or matriarchs. — matriarchic, adj.
See also: Government
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.matriarchate - a form of social organization in which a female is the family head and title is traced through the female linematriarchate - a form of social organization in which a female is the family head and title is traced through the female line
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
References in classic literature ?
Then, what should happen but a cow steps out and puts her head down to munch grass, with her broadside to the battalion, and they a-coming like the wind; they split apart to flank her, but SHE?
As a fisherman, seated, spear in hand, upon some jutting rock {104} throws bait into the water to deceive the poor little fishes, and spears them with the ox's horn with which his spear is shod, throwing them gasping on to the land as he catches them one by one--even so did Scylla land these panting creatures on her rock and munch them up at the mouth of her den, while they screamed and stretched out their hands to me in their mortal agony.
Here ye have a knight with so lean a purse as scarce to buy him a crust of bread to munch, yet he keeps a band of retainers and puts rich trappings upon his horse's hide, while his own back goeth bare.
He's a vegetarian," remarked the Tiger, as the horse began to munch the clover.
asked John Baptist, who had begun, contentedly, to munch his bread.
Some of them sleep during the greater part of the sitting; others carry small portable dinners wrapped in pocket-handkerchiefs or sticking out of their worn-out pockets, and munch and listen with equal relish; but no one among them was ever known to have the slightest personal interest in any case that was ever brought forward.
And as for the female voice: first-wave feminism as epitomized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton contrasted a primordial matriarchate as a "golden age of peace and plenty" with a succeeding patriarchate as the "source of tyranny, wars and [all] social ills," while second-wave feminism, inspired by Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex, combined the aforementioned "contempt" and "condemnation" of paternal dominance with the abandonment of an "essentialist" anthropology.