matriarchy


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ma·tri·ar·chy

 (mā′trē-är′kē)
n. pl. ma·tri·ar·chies
1.
a. A social system in which the mother is head of the family.
b. A family, community, or society based on this system or governed by women.
2. The collection of women in positions of power, especially in such a social system or community. In all senses also called matriarchate.

matriarchy

(ˈmeɪtrɪˌɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) a form of social organization in which a female is head of the family or society, and descent and kinship are traced through the female line
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) any society dominated by women

ma•tri•ar•chy

(ˈmeɪ triˌɑr ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1. a family, society, or state governed by women.
2. a form of social organization in which the mother is head of the family and descent is reckoned in the female line.

matriarchy

1. a community in which the mother or oldest female is the supreme authority, and descent is traced through the female line.
2. government by females, with one as supreme. — matriarchist, n.matriarchic, matriarchical, adj.
See also: Women
a society organized with the mother or oldest female as head of the tribe or clan, with descent being traced through the female line. — matriarch, n.matriarchal, adj.
See also: Government
a system of social order wherein final authority is vested in the mother or eldest female and in which descent is reckoned in the female line. — matriarchal, adj.
See also: Mother
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.matriarchy - a form of social organization in which a female is the family head and title is traced through the female linematriarchy - a form of social organization in which a female is the family head and title is traced through the female line
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
Translations
matriarcatmatriarchie

matriarchy

[ˈmeɪtrɪɑːkɪ] Nmatriarcado m

matriarchy

[ˈmeɪtriɑːrki] nmatriarcat m

matriarchy

nMatriarchat nt

matriarchy

[ˈmeɪtrɪɑːkɪ] nmatriarcato
References in periodicals archive ?
A matriarchy of priestesses who can see into the future and use their powers to influence Britain?
"Welcome to the matriarchy. It's fun - maybe we should try it in other places."
PSbabyonboard" BBC broadcaster Steph McGovern confirms she is expecting a baby "Nobody can pretend that there isn't an ongoing problem within the Labour Party about anti-Semitism, about our processes for dealing with it" Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry speaking on the BBC "Federer is the greatest of all-time here and has the right to get that love, but on the other side you have to respect a fourtime champion a little bit more Boris Becker on Wimbledon champ and crowd underdog Novak Djokovic "Welcome to the matriarchy, it's fun.
"Which is unfortunately still so rare in the festival circuit but look - welcome to the matriarchy, it's fun!
By standard definition, a matriarchy is a "family, group or state governed by a matriarch (a woman who is head of a family or tribe)." Anthropologists and feminists have since created more specific classifications for female societies, including the matrilineal system.
According to her, women participation in politics is not new and it is not about removing patriarchy and enthroning matriarchy.
It's not easy, but the vision of a matriarchy McQueen and Flynn imagine, headed up by a magnetically simmering Davis, is hard-fought and well-earned.
Both Suspiria and The Favourite offer more aggressive interpretations of what it means to be part of a matriarchy, where women choose to dominate others.
In another case, I seized an opportunity to translate matriarkatet (the matriarchy) to "the matriarchate" which denotes matriarchy and connotes the (free) market as well as Mother Market, a concept/ character introduced in the same poem.
Told in three sections, titled "Ma," "Maya," and "Meena" after each of the family's women, the narrative explores lineage, identity, and liberation through matriarchy. By and large, these matriarchies exist within the greater envelope of patriarchy, and their invisible enclaves form wheels within wheels that alternately run over, grind down, and interlock with the novel's characters.
Since Ancient Egypt, Carthage, the Almoravid Empire, Ashanti, Baganda and Abyssinia, the strongest empires in Africa have been variations of African matriarchy wherein the king rules with the female triad of the Queen Mother who can depose him, the Queen Sister who manages the economy and owns title to the nation's land, and the Queen-Wife who is consort and advisor.