matter of course


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matter of course

n.
A natural or logical outcome.

matter of course

n
an event or result that is natural or inevitable
adj
1. (usually postpositive) occurring as a matter of course
2. accepting things as inevitable or natural: a matter-of-course attitude.

mat′ter of course′


n.
something that follows logically or naturally.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.matter of course - an inevitable ending
conclusion, ending, finish - event whose occurrence ends something; "his death marked the ending of an era"; "when these final episodes are broadcast it will be the finish of the show"
References in classic literature ?
Leamington, in New York, who gave a great ball about this time, and being in the same set as the Monsons, the family was invited as a matter of course. It would have surpassed the powers of self-denial to keep me in the back-ground on such an occasion; and Julia, having first cleared the way by owning her folly to a very indulgent father, and a very tormenting brother, determined nobly to bring me out, let the effect on Betts Shoreham be what it might.
I have no doubt that it was largely nervousness that kept the mysterious playwright so long fumbling behind the scenes, for it was obvious that it would be no ordinary sort of play, no every-day domestic drama, that would satisfy this young lady, to whom life had given, by way of prologue, the inestimable blessing of wealth, and the privilege, as a matter of course, of choosing as she would among the grooms (that is, the bride-grooms) of the romantic British aristocracy.
They both took the situation so much as a matter of course that I felt it absurd to do otherwise.
'Ivanhoe' I had known before, and the 'Bride of Lammermoor' and 'Woodstock', but the rest had remained in that sort of abeyance which is often the fate of books people expect to read as a matter of course, and come very near not reading at all, or read only very late.
York might have known, and very likely did know, how that rein harassed me; but I suppose he took it as a matter of course that it could not be helped; at any rate, nothing was done to relieve me.
Casaubon's loan seemed a reflection of that public feeling which held it a matter of course that every one would avoid a connection with her husband.
Thereafter, without prompting, as a matter of course when handed a bone, he carried it to the corner.
Had I been out on the adventure-path, I should as a matter of course have been drinking.
This use of our given names had come about quite as a matter of course, and was as unpremeditated as it was natural.
A Mahometan even suspected of killing that sacred animal, the cow, is, as a matter of course, put to death without mercy in these parts by the pious Hindoo neighbours who surround him.
It was a matter of course that in drawing Indian character he should dwell on the better traits of the picture, rather than on the coarser and more revolting though more common points.
When systematic questioning of the neighbors failed to find any one who claimed it, Pollyanna brought it home at once, as a matter of course.