matters


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mat·ter

 (măt′ər)
n.
1. That which occupies space and has mass; physical substance.
2. A type of such substance: organic matter.
3. Discharge or waste, such as pus or feces, from a living organism.
4. Philosophy In Aristotelian and Scholastic use, that which is in itself undifferentiated and formless and which, as the subject of change and development, receives form and becomes substance.
5. The substance of thought or expression as opposed to the manner in which it is stated or conveyed.
6. A subject of concern, feeling, or action: matters of foreign policy; a personal matter. See Synonyms at subject.
7. Trouble or difficulty: What's the matter with your car?
8. An approximated quantity, amount, or extent: The construction will last a matter of years.
9. Something printed or otherwise set down in writing: reading matter.
intr.v. mat·tered, mat·ter·ing, mat·ters
To be of importance: "Love is most nearly itself / When here and now cease to matter" (T.S. Eliot).
Idioms:
as a matter of fact
In fact; actually.
for that matter
So far as that is concerned; as for that.
no matter
Regardless of: "Yet there isn't a train I wouldn't take, / No matter where it's going" (Edna St. Vincent Millay).

[Middle English mater, from Old French matere, from Latin māteria, wood, timber, matter, from māter, mother (because the woody part was seen as the source of growth); see māter- in Indo-European roots.]

matters

(ˈmætəz)
pl n
the situation in question: matters took an unexpected turn.
References in classic literature ?
Their psychology is bovine, their outlook crude and rare; They abandon vital matters to be tickled with a straw; But the straw that they were tickled with--the chaff that they were fed with-- They convert into a weaver's beam to break their foeman's head with.
He soon convinces you that even these matters can be handled in such a way as to make a person low-spirited.
That first, they ought to refer matters unto them, which is the first begetting, or impregnation; but when they are elaborate, moulded, and shaped in the womb of their counsel, and grow ripe, and ready to be brought forth, that then they suffer not their counsel to go through with the resolution and direction, as if it depended on them; but take the matter back into their own hands, and make it appear to the world, that the decrees and final directions
If you make me an authority in matters of love, for the sake of the argument, I assent.
"Dear Madam [I wrote], It has come to my knowledge that when you walk in the Gardens with the boy David you listen avidly for encomiums of him and of your fanciful dressing of him by passers-by, storing them in your heart the while you make vain pretence to regard them not: wherefore lest you be swollen by these very small things I, who now know David both by day and by night, am minded to compare him and Porthos the one with the other, both in this matter and in other matters of graver account.
"It matters nothing what your father signed, you are the heir of entail.
It is true that her nature sometimes rebelled against these dictates of reason, and that she grew yearly more capricious and impatient; but having a respectful and well-disciplined husband under her thumb at all times, she found it possible, as a rule, to empty any little accumulations of spleen upon his head, and therefore the harmony of the family was kept duly balanced, and things went as smoothly as family matters can.
It dealt in moral and practical maxims, in information on technical subjects which are of service in daily life -- agriculture, astronomy, augury, and the calendar -- in matters of religion and in tracing the genealogies of men.
The squire was inclined to have compounded matters; when, lo!
On the one hand, many psychologists, especially those of the behaviourist school, tend to adopt what is essentially a materialistic position, as a matter of method if not of metaphysics.
"It was through my action in a matter which I understand has been subjected to a great deal of criticism," Thomson replied.
A course to follow in this matter has presented itself to my mind since I received your letter, but my ignorance of details of business and intricacies of law leaves me still uncertain whether my idea is capable of ready and certain execution.