maverick


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mav·er·ick

 (măv′ər-ĭk, măv′rĭk)
n.
1. A person who shows independence of thought and action, especially by refusing to adhere to the policies of a group to which he or she belongs.
2. An unbranded range animal, especially a calf that has become separated from its mother, traditionally considered the property of the first person who brands it.
adj.
Characterized by or displaying independence of thought and action: maverick politicians; a maverick decision.

[Possibly after Samuel Augustus Maverick (1803-1870), American cattleman who left the calves in his herd unbranded .]

maverick

(ˈmævərɪk)
n
1. (Agriculture) (in US and Canadian cattle-raising regions) an unbranded animal, esp a stray calf
2.
a. a person of independent or unorthodox views
b. (as modifier): a maverick politician.
[C19: after Samuel A. Maverick (1803–70), Texas rancher, who did not brand his cattle]

mav•er•ick

(ˈmæv ər ɪk, ˈmæv rɪk)

n.
1. an unbranded animal, esp. a motherless calf.
2. a person who takes a stand independent of others in a group.
[1865–70, Amer.; after Samuel A. Maverick (1803–70), Texas pioneer who left his calves unbranded]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maverick - someone who exhibits great independence in thought and action
recusant, nonconformist - someone who refuses to conform to established standards of conduct
2.maverick - an unbranded range animal (especially a stray calf); belongs to the first person who puts a brand on it
calf - young of domestic cattle
Adj.1.maverick - independent in behavior or thoughtmaverick - independent in behavior or thought; "she led a somewhat irregular private life"; "maverick politicians"
unconventional - not conforming to accepted rules or standards; "her unconventional dress and hair style"

maverick

noun
1. rebel, radical, dissenter, individualist, protester, eccentric, heretic, nonconformist, iconoclast, dissentient He was too much of a maverick to hold high office.
rebel traditionalist, yes man, Babbitt (U.S.), stick-in-the-mud (informal), conventionalist
adjective
1. rebel, radical, dissenting, individualistic, eccentric, heretical, iconoclastic, nonconformist Her maverick behaviour precluded any chance of promotion.
Translations
itsenäinenriippumaton
függetlenindividualista
individualist

maverick

[ˈmævərɪk]
A. N
1. (US) (Agr) → res f sin marcar
2. (= nonconformist) → inconformista mf (Pol etc) → disidente mf
B. ADJ (= nonconformist) → inconformista (Pol) → disidente

maverick

[ˈmævərɪk]
n (= person) → non-conformiste mf

maverick

n
(US Agr) → herrenloses Kalb/Rind ntohne Brandzeichen
(= dissenter)Abtrünnige(r) mf
(= independent person)Alleingänger(in) m(f), → Einzelgänger(in) m(f)

maverick

[ˈmævrɪk]
1. nchi sta fuori del branco
2. adjanticonformista
References in classic literature ?
Mavericks are at present the best for our purpose.- P.
In process of time, thanks to his intimate knowledge of drill and musketry exercise, the excellent Mulcahy, wearing the corporal's stripe, went out in a troopship and joined Her Majesty's Royal Loyal Musketeers, commonly known as the "Mavericks," because they were masterless and unbranded cattle - sons of small farmers in County Clare, shoeless vagabonds of Kerry, herders of Ballyvegan, much wanted "moonlighters" from the bare rainy headlands of the south coast, officered by O'Mores, Bradys, Hills, Kilreas, and the like.
A man that can't get over his liquor in six hours is not fit to belong to the Mavericks!'"
Dan lifted them tenderly and unrolled in the light of the candles the record of the Mavericks - tattered, worn, and hacked.
From that day dated the mutiny of the Mavericks, to the joy of Mulcahy and the pride of his mother in New York - the good lady who sent the money for the beer.
Then the colonel of the Mavericks, reading his newspaper diligently, and scenting Frontier trouble from afar, posted to the army headquarters and pled with the Commander-in-chief for certain privileges, to be granted under certain contingencies,; which contingencies came about only a week later, when the annual little war on the border developed itself and the colonel returned to carry the good news to the Mavericks.
The mutiny had broken out and the barracks of the Mavericks were one white-washed pandemonium.
Bid a boy defy his father when the pantomime-cab is at the door, or a girl develop a will of her own when her mother is putting the last touches to the first ball-dress, but do not ask an Irish regiment to embark upon mutiny on the eve of a campaign, when it has fraternised with the native regiment that accompanies it, and driven its officers into retirement with ten thousand clamorous questions, and the prisoners dance for joy, and the sick men stand in the open calling down all known diseases on the head of the doctor, who has certified that they are "medically unfit for active service." At even the Mavericks might have been mistaken for mutineers by one so unversed in their natures as Mulcahy.
Therefore the Mavericks lay down in open order on the brow of a hill to watch the play till their call should come.
The Black Boneens, who were suffering more than the Mavericks, on a hill half a mile away, began presently to explain to all who cared to listen -
The Mavericks were generally of Horse Egan's opinion.
The half-caste woman who looked after him (she smoked opium, and pretended to keep a second-hand furniture shop by the square where the cheap cabs wait) told the missionaries that she was Kim's mother's sister; but his mother had been nursemaid in a Colonel's family and had married Kimball O'Hara, a young colour- sergeant of the Mavericks, an Irish regiment.