tuberosity

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Related to Maxillary tuberosity: maxillary sinus

tu·ber·os·i·ty

 (to͞o′bə-rŏs′ĭ-tē, tyo͞o′-)
n. pl. tu·ber·os·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being tuberous.
2. A projection or protuberance, especially one at the end of a bone for the attachment of a muscle or tendon.

tuberosity

(ˌtjuːbəˈrɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
(Anatomy) any protuberance on a bone, esp for the attachment of a muscle or ligament

tu•ber•os•i•ty

(ˌtu bəˈrɒs ɪ ti, ˌtyu-)

n., pl. -ties.
a rounded projection or protuberance, as on a bone for the attachment of a muscle.
[1535–45; < Medieval Latin tūberōsitās]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tuberosity - a protuberance on a bone especially for attachment of a muscle or ligamenttuberosity - a protuberance on a bone especially for attachment of a muscle or ligament
deltoid eminence, deltoid tuberosity - a bump on the outside of the humerus where the deltoid muscle attaches
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
Translations
Tuberositas

tu·ber·os·i·ty

n. tuberosidad, elevación o protuberancia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include optimal positioning of the dental implant, predictable esthetic anterior maxillary reconstruction with dental implants and maxillary tuberosity grafts, sinus elevation in the posterior maxilla using the lateral window approach, the interaction between implantology and orthognathic surgery, and peri-implant maintenance therapy for long-term success.
Sphenoidal tubercle is a surgical reference point for the search of maxillary nerve in the surgical access to the infratemporal fossa (Rusu & Leonardi, 2010), considering its close relationship with the groove of the maxillary nerve located in the maxillary tuberosity when it's heading towards the orbit through the inferior orbital fissure such as infraorbitary nerve and the relation established through the origin of the deep portion of the temporal muscle with the foramen rotundum (Testut & Latarjet; Geers et al.).
The immediate dentoalveolar restoration (IDR) technique aims at regenerating, via the autogenous bone of the maxillary tuberosity, the postextracting alveolus that has one or more compromised bone walls, allowing the installation of an immediate implant and its provisioning.
Bounded anteriorly by the last erupted molar, posteriorly by the ramus of the mandible, superiorly by the maxillary tuberosity, and inferiorly by the retromolar trigone, the retromolar space has been used for flexible fiberoptic oral intubation in patients with severe trismus in whom the reduced interincisor distance does not allow for placement of a rigid laryngoscope or a tracheal tube between the teeth [6].
During Caldwell-Luc procedure, incision is made 5mm below the gingivolabial sulcus extending from pyriform aperture medially to the maxillary tuberosity laterally.
The iliac crest is of- ten used as donor site although other extra-oral (calvaria) and intra-oral (mandibular ramus and/ or symphysis, maxillary tuberosity, etc...) sites have been described.