mayapple

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may·ap·ple

or May apple  (mā′ăp′əl)
n.
1. A rhizomatous plant (Podophyllum peltatum) of eastern North America, having large umbrellalike leaves, a single, nodding white flower, and yellow fruit. The ripe fruit is edible, but the roots, leaves, and seeds of the plant are poisonous.
2. The fruit of this plant. In both senses also called mandrake.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mayapple - North American herb with poisonous root stock and edible though insipid fruitmayapple - North American herb with poisonous root stock and edible though insipid fruit
genus Podophyllum, Podophyllum - perennial rhizomatous herbs
May apple - edible but insipid fruit of the May apple plant
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
References in periodicals archive ?
This is where we would bring picnics, sit in quiet churches and walk along trails lined with mayapples, jonquils and honeysuckle.
With the coming of spring, a creek-side carpet of yellow trout lily and pink and white spring beauty is soon enhanced by Virginia bluebells, Jack-in-the-pulpit and later Mayapples and wild blue phlox.
By midsummer, the woods are full of ripening berries: wild straw-berries appear in June, followed by passion fruit (in the Southeast), blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, mulberries, serviceberries and mayapples in July.
By midsummer, the woods are full of ripening berries: wild strawberries appear in June, followed by passion fruit (in the Southeast), blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, mulberries, serviceberries and mayapples in July.
Other types of early soft mast that deserve at least passing mention: sumac berries, American beauty berries (French mulberries), pawpaws and mayapples. Sumac, easily spotted because of its brilliant colors of red and magenta, is one of the first harbingers of fall along banks and roadsides, while beauty berries--with their distinctive pink--are found in the forest understory.