mead


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Related to mead: Margaret Mead

mead 1

 (mēd)
n.
An alcoholic beverage made from fermented honey and water.

[Middle English mede, mead, from Old English medu, meodu; see medhu- in Indo-European roots.]

mead 2

 (mēd)
n. Archaic
A meadow.

[Middle English mede, from Old English mǣd; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

mead

(miːd)
n
(Brewing) an alcoholic drink made by fermenting a solution of honey, often with spices added
[Old English meodu; related to Old High German metu, Greek methu, Welsh medd]

mead

(miːd)
n
(Physical Geography) an archaic or poetic word for meadow
[Old English mǣd]

Mead

(miːd)
n
(Placename) Lake Mead a reservoir in NW Arizona and SE Nevada, formed by the Hoover Dam across the Colorado River: one of the largest man-made lakes in the world. Area: 588 sq km (227 sq miles)

Mead

(miːd)
n
(Biography) Margaret. 1901–78, US anthropologist. Her works include Coming of Age in Samoa (1928) and Male and Female (1949)

mead1

(mid)

n.
an alcoholic drink of fermented honey and water.
[before 900; Old English me(o)du; c. Old High German metu, Skt madhu honey, Greek méthy wine]

mead2

(mid)

n. Archaic.
meadow.
[before 1000; Middle English mede, Old English mǣd]

Mead

(mid)

n.
1. Margaret, 1901–78, U.S. anthropologist.
2. Lake, a lake in NW Arizona and SE Nevada, formed by Hoover Dam on the Colorado River. 227 sq. mi. (588 sq. km).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mead - United States anthropologist noted for her claims about adolescence and sexual behavior in Polynesian cultures (1901-1978)Mead - United States anthropologist noted for her claims about adolescence and sexual behavior in Polynesian cultures (1901-1978)
2.Mead - United States philosopher of pragmatism (1863-1931)
3.mead - made of fermented honey and watermead - made of fermented honey and water  
honey - a sweet yellow liquid produced by bees
brew, brewage - drink made by steeping and boiling and fermenting rather than distilling
metheglin - spiced or medicated mead
hydromel - honey diluted in water; becomes mead when fermented
Translations
medovina
mjød
mõdu
mjöður
はちみつ酒ミード
mjød
medovina
mjöd

mead

[miːd] Naguamiel f, hidromiel m

mead

[ˈmiːd] nhydromel m

mead

1
n (= drink)Met m

mead

2
n (old, poet)Aue f

mead

1 [miːd] nidromele m

mead

2 [miːd] n (liter) (meadow) → prato
References in classic literature ?
Mead, a little oddly, his eyes resting on Miss Polly, who, with a vivid blush, had turned hastily away.
Mead had to stay--he had caught Miss Polly as she fell.
Will you not give her a glass of mead? But you will have to speak loud, for she is very hard of hearing.'
'Oh yes, certainly I will!' said the host; and, pouring out a large glass of mead, he took it out to the dead grandmother, who was sitting upright in the cart.
"One more round of mead or ale and the score to the last comer."
The common drink of the Abyssins is beer and mead, which they drink to excess when they visit one another; nor can there be a greater offence against good manners than to let the guests go away sober: their liquor is always presented by a servant, who drinks first himself, and then gives the cup to the company, in the order of their quality.
Do thou, sweet Zephyrus, rising from thy fragrant bed, mount the western sky, and lead on those delicious gales, the charms of which call forth the lovely Flora from her chamber, perfumed with pearly dews, when on the 1st of June, her birth-day, the blooming maid, in loose attire, gently trips it over the verdant mead, where every flower rises to do her homage, till the whole field becomes enamelled, and colours contend with sweets which shall ravish her most.
On the tray was a bottle of herb wine, different kinds of vodka, pickled mushrooms, rye cakes made with buttermilk, honey in the comb, still mead and sparkling mead, apples, nuts (raw and roasted), and nut-and-honey sweets.
Thence she started on foot, basket in hand, to reach the wide upland of heath dividing this district from the low-lying meads of a further valley in which the dairy stood that was the aim and end of her day's pilgrimage.
Spite of this frigid winter night in the boisterous Atlantic, spite of my wet feet and wetter jacket, there was yet, it then seemed to me, many a pleasant haven in store; and meads and glades so eternally vernal, that the grass shot up by the spring, untrodden, unwilted, remains at midsummer.
It was as though he had sailed for many years over a great waste of waters, with peril and privation, and at last had come upon a fair haven, but as he was about to enter, some contrary wind had arisen and drove him out again into the open sea; and because he had let his mind dwell on these soft meads and pleasant woods of the land, the vast deserts of the ocean filled him with anguish.
Around the nicest green meads, where the deer were playing in the grass, grew magnificent oaks and beeches; and if the bark of one of the trees was cracked, there grass and long creeping plants grew in the crevices.