meagre

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mea·ger

also mea·gre  (mē′gər)
adj.
1. Deficient in quantity, fullness, or extent; scanty.
2. Deficient in richness, fertility, or vigor; feeble: the meager soil of an eroded plain.
3. Having little flesh; lean.

[Middle English megre, thin, from Old French, from Latin macer; see māk- in Indo-European roots.]

mea′ger·ly adv.
mea′ger·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

meagre

(ˈmiːɡə) or

meager

adj
1. deficient in amount, quality, or extent
2. thin or emaciated
3. lacking in richness or strength
[C14: from Old French maigre, from Latin macer lean, poor]
ˈmeagrely, ˈmeagerly adv
ˈmeagreness, ˈmeagerness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.meagre - deficient in amount or quality or extentmeagre - deficient in amount or quality or extent; "meager resources"; "meager fare"
scarce - deficient in quantity or number compared with the demand; "fresh vegetables were scarce during the drought"
minimal, minimum - the least possible; "needed to enforce minimal standards"; "her grades were minimal"; "minimum wage"; "a minimal charge for the service"
insufficient, deficient - of a quantity not able to fulfill a need or requirement; "insufficient funds"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

meagre

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
هَزيل، ضئيل
hubenýskrovný
ringe
magur; rÿr, fátæklegur
skurdumasskurdusskurdžiai
nepietiekamsvājš

meagre

meager (US) [ˈmiːgəʳ] ADJ [amount, salary, rations] → escaso, exiguo
he eked out a meagre existence as a labourera duras penas se ganaba la vida trabajando de peón
his salary is a meagre £350 a monthgana unas míseras 350 libras al mes
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

meagre

[ˈmiːgər] (British) meager (US) adj [supply, resources, pay rise] → maigre before n
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

meagre

, (US) meager
adj
spärlich; amount, crowdkläglich; mealdürftig, kärglich; to eke out a meagre existenceein kümmerliches Dasein fristen; he earns a meagre £500 a monther verdient magere or mickrige (inf)£ 500 im Monat
(liter: = lean) → hager
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

meagre

meager (Am) [ˈmiːgəʳ] adjmagro/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

meagre

(American) meager (ˈmiːgə) adjective
poor or not enough. meagre earnings.
ˈmeagrely adverb
ˈmeagreness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the quatrain "Above Oblivion's Tide there is a Pier" (F11552/1881), the speaker pays a tribute to a few "effaceless," who manage to "lift themselves"; representing "Fame" as "one Smile--that meagres Balms" and evoking the variant "chill" and "bleak" to modify the "smile," the speaker also suggests that the fame is unnecessarily preferable and "Oblivion" might be not undesirable.