mealies


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Related to mealies: mealie meal

mea·lie

also mie·lie  (mē′lē)
n. South African
1. An ear of corn.
2. mealies Corn; maize.

[Afrikaans mielie, ultimately from Latin milium, millet (perhaps via Portuguese milho); see melə- in Indo-European roots.]

mealies

(ˈmiːlɪz) or

mielies

n (functioning as singular)
(Plants) maize
Translations
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References in classic literature ?
In the mealie gardens I stopped awhile, for I was very hungry, and filled myself with the half-ripe mealies.
Presently we heard a shouting outside, and stepping to the door, saw a line of damsels bearing milk and roasted mealies, and honey in a pot.
Minister Molao was also happy that horticulture production was also increasing and farmers mostly supplied onions, water melons, butternuts, spinach and green mealies.
Ndlovukati, our cattle will soon be dead, and there are no mealies. Make rain, you starve us all." (18) If she was persuaded, strong winds would come and it would rain torrentially.
was among the most important food plants, grown as a cereal or beverage, with its dry seeds pounded into samp or green mealies either roasted or cooked.
The hills and kloofs were still covered with natural forests and bamboo thickets; several streams flowed down the many gorges into the bigger stream Qomoqomong, on whose banks were rich fields of wheat, mealies and kaffir-corn.
"This will learneth that Slurbitobe a lesson or three And dissuade it from penicking our mealies".
Many people live under the misconception that farming fish is just a case of putting fish into a dam and feeding them manure and mealies. Believe me this is not the case, fish farming is as intensive as growing any other livestock.
Upon entering the gallery I was taken back to my village, --dusty roads, mud brick houses, children playing in the field and the smell of roasted mealies. The paintings in the room depicted village life as we know it, a red cockerel strutting around proudly pecking at the ground for small pieces of food.
The Ndebele called it Lykwela mkobe, and the Zulu spoke of iCelankobe, meaning "Asking for Mealies".
In contrast, South Africa was suffering from the high cost of mealies (maize, corn), which is a primary stable of the South African diet.
* Fibre-containing foods are bran-containing, whole wheat, grains and seeds, vegetables like green beans, peas, sem (papry), marrow, mealies, spinach, and other herbs like methie, the leaves of beetroot (iron-rich), fruit with skin, dried fruit especially dried apricots, figs and prunes, almonds, etc.