mean sun

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mean sun

n.
A hypothetical sun defined as moving at a uniform rate along the celestial equator at the mean speed with which the real sun apparently moves along the ecliptic, used in computing the mean solar day.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mean sun

n
(Astronomy) an imaginary sun moving along the celestial equator at a constant rate and completing its annual course in the same time as the sun takes to move round the ecliptic at a varying rate. It is used in the measurement of mean solar time
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mean′ sun′


n.
an imaginary sun moving uniformly in the celestial equator and taking the same time to make its annual circuit as the true sun does in the ecliptic.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mean sun - a theoretical sun that moves along the celestial equator at a constant speed and completes its annual course in the same amount of time the real sun takes at variable speeds
framework, model, theoretical account - a hypothetical description of a complex entity or process; "the computer program was based on a model of the circulatory and respiratory systems"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the quasi-stationary appearance of mean sun fraction, a careful examination of moving averages and the number of sunny days (>92% sun fraction, shown as the purple line in Fig.
It is interesting that the midcentury recovery in the number of annual sunny days is much more pronounced than the small rises in mean sun fraction: from minimums of about 25 in the 1920s back to counts exceeding 80 fully sunny days per year by the mid-1960s.