meanderingly


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me·an·der

 (mē-ăn′dər)
intr.v. me·an·dered, me·an·der·ing, me·an·ders
1. To follow a winding and turning course: Streams tend to meander through level land.
2. To move aimlessly and idly without fixed direction: vagabonds meandering through life. See Synonyms at wander.
3. To speak or write in sustained fashion on a number of loosely connected topics.
4. To be directed in various directions or at multiple objects: His gaze meandered over the church's façade.
n.
1. often meanders A bend, turn, or winding, as of a stream or path.
2. A portion, side trip, or episode in a longer journey.
3. A passage on a subtopic or digression in a longer piece of discourse.
4. An ornamental pattern of winding or intertwining lines, used in art and architecture.

[From Latin maeander, circuitous windings, from Greek maiandros, after Maiandros, the Maeander River in Phrygia, noted for its windings.]

me·an′der·er n.
me·an′der·ing·ly adv.
me·an′drous (-drəs) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.meanderingly - in a meandering mannermeanderingly - in a meandering manner; "the river ran meanderingly through the valley"
References in periodicals archive ?
It's probably because the ponderous crime anthology's first season caused such a stir when it premiered five (yes, five) years ago, and viewers became enraptured by its extra-motivated star, Matthew McConaughey, who spun gold from the less impressive straw of creator Nic Pizzolotto's meanderingly grim, pretentiously philosophical and even hackneyed notion of what a prestige crime drama set in the South ought to look like.
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