meane


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meane

(miːn)
vb
to complain or lament
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The Baie or Laurell tree commeth oftentimes to the height of a tree of a meane bignesse; it is full of boughes, couered with a greene barke: the leaues thereof are long, broad, hard, of colour greene, sweetely smelling, and in taste somewhat bitter: the flowers alongst the boughes and leaues are of a greene colour: the berries are more long then round, and be couered with a blacke rinde or pill; the kernell within is clouen into two parts, like that of the Peach and Almond, and other such, [it is] of a browne yellowish colour, sweete of smell, in taste somewhat bitter, with a little sharpe or biting qualitie.
Nowe as it is not possible to passe from one extreme to an other, but by a meane; and no meane is there in the nature of man but spirit: by this only the bodie affecteth the mind: and the bodie and spirits affected, partly by disorder, and partly through outward occasions, minister discontentment as it were to the mind: and in the ende breake that bande of fellowship, wherewith they were both linked to-gether.
At various points, Luxurio admits that 'all my debtes stande chaukt vpon the poste for liquor' (1.1.437), announces that he will drink himself blind in honour of Homer (5.2.1491-3), declares, 'I meane to drincke the worlde drye' (5.2.1517), etc.
Historian John Leland described it (though he didn't name it) as "one street going up alonge, almost the left ripe of the brooke, up a meane hill, by the length of a quarter of a mile."
And in the meane time till the sayd Union be established with the due solemnitie aforesayd, his Majestie doth hereby repute, hold, and esteeme, and commands all his Highnes Subjects to repute, hold, and esteeme both the two Realmes as presently united, and as one Realme and Kingdome, and the Subjects of both the Realmes as one people, brethren and members of one body.
1-2 (2008): 150-67; Maya Mathur, '"To all kind of estates I meane for to trudge:' Making Room for the Commoners in Cambises" Early Theatre 17 (2014): 35-55.
Doe so, and find out a Priest i'the meane time, I'le bring the License.
From left: Barbara Travis, Mark King, Sarah Smithson, operations manager at Stick 'n' Step, Val Coe, Cheryl Bradley, Rhys Griffiths and Nicola and Max Meane
By the benefit of this excellent gift, (I meane of apt speech given by nature, and guided by Art) wisedome appeareth in her beautie, sheweth her maiestie, and exerciseth her power, working in the minde of the hearer, partly by a pleasant proportion, and as it were by a sweet and musicall harmonie, and partly by the secret and mightie power of perswasion after a most wonderfull manner ([AB3.sup.r]).
(28) In the meane space our waterman not daring to abide the terrible tryall of examination, because the Duke of Saxon was in Armes against the King of Beame, he ran away, (JOTAYLOR-E2-P2, 3,98.C2.1)
They screwed their scurvy jawes and look't awry, Like hissing snakes adjudging it to die: Clapping, or hissing, is the onely meane That tries and searches out a well write Sceane, The stinkards oft will hisse without a cause, And for a baudy jeast will give applause.
"So clokedlye vndre darke couer-ture | we haue not walked / in this Historye," Forrest writes, his ambition being that "Readers / may vndrestande sure | the meane of oure mentioned memorye | not fygured/ as by Alligorye." (14) If the literature of the Henrician age was a literature under threat, one that was required to tiptoe around the domineering will of the monarch, then The Seconde Grisilde is a poem of cultural disenthrallment, one that "playnlye" tells the "Historye" of Henry VIII's "Great Matter," and this from the queen's perspective, not the king's.