measles

(redirected from measles vaccine)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

mea·sles

 (mē′zəlz)
n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
1.
a. An acute, contagious viral disease, usually occurring in childhood and characterized by eruption of red spots on the skin, fever, and catarrhal symptoms. Also called rubeola.
b. Black measles.
c. Any of several other diseases, especially German measles, that cause similar but milder symptoms.
2. A condition of pork or beef caused by the presence of tapeworm larvae.
3. A plant disease, usually caused by fungi, that produces small spots on leaves, stems, or fruit.

[Middle English maseles, mesels, pl. of masel, measles-spot, of Middle Low German origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

measles

(ˈmiːzəlz)
n (functioning as singular or plural)
1. (Pathology) a highly contagious viral disease common in children, characterized by fever, profuse nasal discharge of mucus, conjunctivitis, and a rash of small red spots spreading from the forehead down to the limbs. Technical names: morbilli or rubeola See also German measles
2. (Veterinary Science) a disease of cattle, sheep, and pigs, caused by infestation with tapeworm larvae
[C14: from Middle Low German masele spot on the skin; influenced by Middle English mesel leper, from Latin misellus, diminutive of miser wretched]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mea•sles

(ˈmi zəlz)

n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
a. an acute infectious disease caused by a paramyxovirus, characterized by small red spots, fever, and coldlike symptoms, usu. occurring in childhood; rubeola.
b. any of certain other eruptive diseases, esp. rubella.
2.
a. a disease mostly of domestic swine caused by tapeworm larvae in the flesh.
b. the larvae.
[1275–1325; alter. of maseles (pl.), probably < Middle Dutch masel; akin to German Masern measles, pl. of Maser speck]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mea·sles

(mē′zəlz)
A highly contagious disease that is caused by a virus and usually occurs in childhood. Symptoms include fever, coughing, and a rash that begins on the face and then spreads to other parts of the body.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.measles - an acute and highly contagious viral disease marked by distinct red spots followed by a rashmeasles - an acute and highly contagious viral disease marked by distinct red spots followed by a rash; occurs primarily in children
contagion, contagious disease - any disease easily transmitted by contact
epidemic roseola, German measles, rubella, three-day measles - a contagious viral disease that is a milder form of measles lasting three or four days; can be damaging to a fetus during the first trimester
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حُصْبَةٌحَصْبَه، حُمَيْراء
spalničky
mæslinger
tuhkarokko
ospice
kanyaró
mislingar
はしか
홍역
raudonukėtymai
masalas
ošpice
mässlingen
โรคหัด
bệnh sởi

measles

[ˈmiːzlz] NSINGsarampión m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

measles

[ˈmiːzəlz] nrougeole f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

measles

n singMasern pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

measles

[ˈmiːzlz] nmorbillo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

measles

(ˈmiːzlz) noun singular
an infectious disease accompanied by red spots on the skin. People usually get measles in childhood.
German ˈmeasles noun
a mild infectious disease with symptoms of tiny red spots on the body, fever and cough.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

measles

حُصْبَةٌ spalničky mæslinger Masern ιλαρά sarampión tuhkarokko rougeole ospice morbillo はしか 홍역 mazelen meslinger odra sarampo корь mässlingen โรคหัด kızamık bệnh sởi 麻疹
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

mea·sles

n. sarampión;
pop.Mex. tapetillo de los niños, enfermedad sumamente contagiosa esp. en niños de edad escolar causada por el virus de la rubéola.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

measles

n sarampión m; German o three-day — rubéola or rubeola (form), sarampión alemán
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Health experts warn that lies about the measles vaccine have allowed the illness to spread in certain areas or communities.
According to the market reports, the market for measles vaccine is exhibiting a substantial growth along with awareness about the disease among the people have motivated them to treat it effectively.
He pointed out that two doses of the measles vaccine is recommended to ensure immunity in children and to prevent outbreaks.
A child considered to be within the FIC category is one who received a dose of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine and Hepatitis B at birth; three doses of DPT/Pentavalent within the 6th, 10th and 14th weeks in the life of a child and one dose of the measles vaccine at nine months.
To prevent another measles outbreak, the Department of Health and the Department of Education (DepEd) signed a joint memorandum circular that makes it mandatory for all learners from kindergarten to Grade 6 to be given a second dose of measles vaccine.
and many other countries are experiencing concerning outbreaks of measles because of declines in measles vaccine coverage.
What adults should know about the measles vaccine as disease makes a comeback
(1,3) Twelve papers examining seropositivity in children who received a second measles vaccine after early primary vaccination found a pooled proportion of seropositivity of 97%.
Globally, the report shows, 169 million children were not given a first dose of measles vaccine between 2010 and 2017.
Today, however, the United States and many other countries that had also eliminated the disease are experiencing concerning outbreaks of measles because of declines in measles vaccine coverage.
The DOH noted that close to 60 percent of the cases this year involved children who were not inoculated with the measles vaccine.

Full browser ?