measure up


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measure
from "Roses of the South," a waltz by Johann Strauss the Younger

meas·ure

 (mĕzh′ər)
n.
1.
a. A reference standard or sample used for the quantitative comparison of properties: The standard kilogram is maintained as a measure of mass.
b. A unit specified by a scale, such as an inch, or by variable conditions, such as a day's march.
c. A system of measurement, such as the metric system.
d. The dimensions, quantity, or capacity of something as ascertained by comparison with a standard: curtains made to measure; took his measure for the suit jacket.
e. A device used for measuring.
f. The act of measuring: By measure the picture was four feet tall.
2. An evaluation or a basis of comparison: "the final measure of the worth of a society" (Joseph Wood Krutch).
3. Extent or degree: The problem was in large measure caused by his carelessness.
4.
a. A definite quantity that has been measured out: a measure of wine.
b. A fitting amount: a measure of recognition.
c. A limited amount or degree: a measure of goodwill.
5.
a. Limit; bounds: generosity knowing no measure.
b. Appropriate restraint; moderation: "The union of ... fervor with measure, passion with correctness, this surely is the ideal" (William James).
6.
a. An action taken as a means to an end; an expedient: measures taken to improve energy efficiency.
b. A law or ballot initiative adopted by a legislature as a remedy for a problem.
7.
a. Poetic meter.
b. Music The metric unit between two bars on the staff; a bar.
v. meas·ured, meas·ur·ing, meas·ures
v.tr.
1.
a. To ascertain the dimensions, quantity, or capacity of: measured the height of the ceiling.
b. To mark, lay out, or establish dimensions for by measuring: measure off an area.
c. To mark off or apportion, usually with reference to a given unit of measurement: measure out a pint of milk.
d. To allot or distribute as if by measuring; mete: The revolutionary tribunal measured out harsh justice.
2.
a. To estimate by evaluation or comparison: "I gave them an account ... of the situation as far as I could measure it" (Winston S. Churchill).
b. To bring into comparison: She measured her power with that of a dangerous adversary.
3. To serve as a measure of: The inch measures length.
4. To consider or choose with care; weigh: He measures his words with caution.
5. Archaic To travel over: "We must measure twenty miles today" (Shakespeare).
v.intr.
1. To be of a specific measurement: The room measures 12 by 20 feet.
2. To take a measurement.
3. To allow of measurement: White sugar measures more easily than brown.
Phrasal Verb:
measure up
1. To be the equal of something; have similar quality.
2. To have the necessary qualifications: a candidate who just didn't measure up.
Idioms:
beyond measure
1. In excess.
2. Without limit.
for good measure
In addition to the required amount.
in a/some measure
To a degree: The new law was in a measure harmful.

[Middle English, from Old French mesure, from Latin mēnsūra, from mēnsus, past participle of mētīrī, to measure; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

meas′ur·er n.

measure up

vb
1. (adverb) to determine the size of (something) by measurement
2. measure up to to fulfil (expectations, standards, etc)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.measure up - prove capable or fitmeasure up - prove capable or fit; meet requirements
suffice, answer, do, serve - be sufficient; be adequate, either in quality or quantity; "A few words would answer"; "This car suits my purpose well"; "Will $100 do?"; "A 'B' grade doesn't suffice to get me into medical school"; "Nothing else will serve"

measure

noun
1. The amount of space occupied by something:
dimension, extent, magnitude, proportion (often used in plural), size.
2. Relative intensity or amount, as of a quality or attribute:
3. A means by which individuals are compared and judged:
4. The act or process of ascertaining dimensions, quantity, or capacity:
5. That which is allotted:
Informal: cut.
Slang: divvy.
6. Avoidance of extremes of opinion, feeling, or personal conduct:
7. An action calculated to achieve an end.Often used in plural:
8. The formal product of a legislative or judicial body:
9. The patterned, recurring alternation of contrasting elements, such as stressed and unstressed notes in music:
verb
1. To ascertain the dimensions, quantity, or capacity of:
Archaic: mete.
2. To fix the limits of:
phrasal verb
measure out
To set aside or distribute as a share:
phrasal verb
measure up
To be equal or alike:
Informal: stack up.
Translations
يَصِل المُستَوى المَطْلوب
dosáhnout úrovně
måle sig med
uppfylla, standast
beklenildiği gibi çıkmak-e erişmek

w>measure up

vt sep
(= take measurements of) wood, room etcabmessen; person for suit etcMaß nehmen bei
(fig: = assess) situationabschätzen; personeinschätzen
vi
(= be good enough, compare well) he didn’t measure uper hat enttäuscht; to measure up to somethingan etw (acc)herankommen; visually he measured up (to the description)vom Aussehen her passte er (auf die Beschreibung); it’s a hard job, but he should measure updas ist eine schwierige Aufgabe, aber er sollte ihr gewachsen sein
(= take measurements)Maß nehmen, messen

measure

(ˈmeʒə) noun
1. an instrument for finding the size, amount etc of something. a glass measure for liquids; a tape-measure.
2. a unit. The metre is a measure of length.
3. a system of measuring. dry/liquid/square measure.
4. a plan of action or something done. We must take (= use, or put into action) certain measures to stop the increase in crime.
5. a certain amount. a measure of sympathy.
6. (in music) the musical notes contained between two bar lines.
verb
1. to find the size, amount etc of (something). He measured the table.
2. to show the size, amount etc of. A thermometer measures temperature.
3. (with against, ~besides etc) to judge in comparison with. She measured her skill in cooking against her friend's.
4. to be a certain size. This table measures two metres by one metre.
ˈmeasurement noun
1. size, amount etc found by measuring. What are the measurements of this room?
2. the sizes of various parts of the body, usually the distance round the chest, waist and hips. What are your measurements, madam?
3. the act of measuring. We can find the size of something by means of measurement.
beyond measure
very great. I'm offering you riches beyond measure!
for good measure
as something extra or above the minimum necessary. The shopkeeper weighed out the sweets and put in a few more for good measure.
full measure
(no less than) the correct amount. We must ensure that customers get full measure.
made to measure (of clothing) made to fit the measurements of a particular person: Was your jacket made to measure?; adjective (etc)
a made-to-measure suit.
measure out
to mark (off), weigh (out) a certain distance, amount. He measured out a kilo of sugar.
measure up (often with to)
to reach a certain required standard. John's performance doesn't measure up (to the others).
References in periodicals archive ?
It's an accomplished first novel, successfully conveying the fear that lies behind David's bravado and his conflicted feelings about the war, as well as Steve's desire to measure up to his older brother and to win his respect.