measures


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measure
from "Roses of the South," a waltz by Johann Strauss the Younger

meas·ure

 (mĕzh′ər)
n.
1.
a. A reference standard or sample used for the quantitative comparison of properties: The standard kilogram is maintained as a measure of mass.
b. A unit specified by a scale, such as an inch, or by variable conditions, such as a day's march.
c. A system of measurement, such as the metric system.
d. The dimensions, quantity, or capacity of something as ascertained by comparison with a standard: curtains made to measure; took his measure for the suit jacket.
e. A device used for measuring.
f. The act of measuring: By measure the picture was four feet tall.
2. An evaluation or a basis of comparison: "the final measure of the worth of a society" (Joseph Wood Krutch).
3. Extent or degree: The problem was in large measure caused by his carelessness.
4.
a. A definite quantity that has been measured out: a measure of wine.
b. A fitting amount: a measure of recognition.
c. A limited amount or degree: a measure of goodwill.
5.
a. Limit; bounds: generosity knowing no measure.
b. Appropriate restraint; moderation: "The union of ... fervor with measure, passion with correctness, this surely is the ideal" (William James).
6.
a. An action taken as a means to an end; an expedient: measures taken to improve energy efficiency.
b. A law or ballot initiative adopted by a legislature as a remedy for a problem.
7.
a. Poetic meter.
b. Music The metric unit between two bars on the staff; a bar.
v. meas·ured, meas·ur·ing, meas·ures
v.tr.
1.
a. To ascertain the dimensions, quantity, or capacity of: measured the height of the ceiling.
b. To mark, lay out, or establish dimensions for by measuring: measure off an area.
c. To mark off or apportion, usually with reference to a given unit of measurement: measure out a pint of milk.
d. To allot or distribute as if by measuring; mete: The revolutionary tribunal measured out harsh justice.
2.
a. To estimate by evaluation or comparison: "I gave them an account ... of the situation as far as I could measure it" (Winston S. Churchill).
b. To bring into comparison: She measured her power with that of a dangerous adversary.
3. To serve as a measure of: The inch measures length.
4. To consider or choose with care; weigh: He measures his words with caution.
5. Archaic To travel over: "We must measure twenty miles today" (Shakespeare).
v.intr.
1. To be of a specific measurement: The room measures 12 by 20 feet.
2. To take a measurement.
3. To allow of measurement: White sugar measures more easily than brown.
Phrasal Verb:
measure up
1. To be the equal of something; have similar quality.
2. To have the necessary qualifications: a candidate who just didn't measure up.
Idioms:
beyond measure
1. In excess.
2. Without limit.
for good measure
In addition to the required amount.
in a/some measure
To a degree: The new law was in a measure harmful.

[Middle English, from Old French mesure, from Latin mēnsūra, from mēnsus, past participle of mētīrī, to measure; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

meas′ur·er n.

measures

(ˈmɛʒəz)
pl n
(Geological Science) rock strata that are characterized by a particular type of sediment or deposit: coal measures.
References in classic literature ?
said Jo, looking ready for any measures, however violent.
One of the bearers was bitten by a poisonous snake, and though prompt measures were taken, the poison spread so rapidly that the man died.
It was, of course, with a perfect understanding of the minute and intricate interests which had armed friend against friend, and brought natural enemies to combat by each other's side, that the scout and his companions now disposed themselves to deliberate on the measures that were to govern their future movements, amid so many jarring and savage races of men.
and dance she would, not in such court-like measures as she had learned abroad, but Some high-paced jig, or hop-skip rigadoon, befitting the brisk lasses at a rustic merry-making.
I recognized, as I looked at the pair of short, thick oars, quite safely drawn up, the prodigious character of the feat for a little girl; but I had lived, by this time, too long among wonders and had panted to too many livelier measures.
Nevertheless he had taken private measures of his own touching all that matter.
Those who, while they disapprove of the character and measures of a government, yield to it their allegiance and support are undoubtedly its most conscientious supporters, and so frequently the most serious obstacles to reform.
He was a stranger to nearly every member of that body; but, having recently made his escape from the south- ern prison-house of bondage, and feeling his curiosity excited to ascertain the principles and measures of the abolitionists,--of whom he had heard a somewhat vague description while he was a slave,--he was in- duced to give his attendance, on the occasion al- luded to, though at that time a resident in New Bedford.
It was no longer in Emma's power to superintend his happiness or quicken his measures.
Ferrars is a very headstrong proud woman, and in her first fit of anger upon hearing it, would very likely secure every thing to Robert, and the idea of that, for Edward's sake, frightens away all my inclination for hasty measures.
The results of what you have done become in time to you utterly insupportable; you take measures to obtain relief: unusual measures, but neither unlawful nor culpable.
Are we to try any measures for overtaking and bringing her back,' I inquired.

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