measures


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measure
from "Roses of the South," a waltz by Johann Strauss the Younger

meas·ure

 (mĕzh′ər)
n.
1.
a. A reference standard or sample used for the quantitative comparison of properties: The standard kilogram is maintained as a measure of mass.
b. A unit specified by a scale, such as an inch, or by variable conditions, such as a day's march.
c. A system of measurement, such as the metric system.
d. The dimensions, quantity, or capacity of something as ascertained by comparison with a standard: curtains made to measure; took his measure for the suit jacket.
e. A device used for measuring.
f. The act of measuring: By measure the picture was four feet tall.
2. An evaluation or a basis of comparison: "the final measure of the worth of a society" (Joseph Wood Krutch).
3. Extent or degree: The problem was in large measure caused by his carelessness.
4.
a. A definite quantity that has been measured out: a measure of wine.
b. A fitting amount: a measure of recognition.
c. A limited amount or degree: a measure of goodwill.
5.
a. Limit; bounds: generosity knowing no measure.
b. Appropriate restraint; moderation: "The union of ... fervor with measure, passion with correctness, this surely is the ideal" (William James).
6.
a. An action taken as a means to an end; an expedient: measures taken to improve energy efficiency.
b. A law or ballot initiative adopted by a legislature as a remedy for a problem.
7.
a. Poetic meter.
b. Music The metric unit between two bars on the staff; a bar.
v. meas·ured, meas·ur·ing, meas·ures
v.tr.
1.
a. To ascertain the dimensions, quantity, or capacity of: measured the height of the ceiling.
b. To mark, lay out, or establish dimensions for by measuring: measure off an area.
c. To mark off or apportion, usually with reference to a given unit of measurement: measure out a pint of milk.
d. To allot or distribute as if by measuring; mete: The revolutionary tribunal measured out harsh justice.
2.
a. To estimate by evaluation or comparison: "I gave them an account ... of the situation as far as I could measure it" (Winston S. Churchill).
b. To bring into comparison: She measured her power with that of a dangerous adversary.
3. To serve as a measure of: The inch measures length.
4. To consider or choose with care; weigh: He measures his words with caution.
5. Archaic To travel over: "We must measure twenty miles today" (Shakespeare).
v.intr.
1. To be of a specific measurement: The room measures 12 by 20 feet.
2. To take a measurement.
3. To allow of measurement: White sugar measures more easily than brown.
Phrasal Verb:
measure up
1. To be the equal of something; have similar quality.
2. To have the necessary qualifications: a candidate who just didn't measure up.
Idioms:
beyond measure
1. In excess.
2. Without limit.
for good measure
In addition to the required amount.
in a/some measure
To a degree: The new law was in a measure harmful.

[Middle English, from Old French mesure, from Latin mēnsūra, from mēnsus, past participle of mētīrī, to measure; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

meas′ur·er n.

measures

(ˈmɛʒəz)
pl n
(Geological Science) rock strata that are characterized by a particular type of sediment or deposit: coal measures.
References in classic literature ?
"Let us go to the king's tailor," he said; "and since he measures the king, I think, by my faith, I may do worse than allow him to measure me!
Stremov, carrying with him several members, went over to Alexey Alexandrovitch's side, and not contenting himself with warmly defending the measure proposed by Karenin, proposed other more extreme measures in the same direction.
It is true, as has been before observed that facts, too stubborn to be resisted, have produced a species of general assent to the abstract proposition that there exist material defects in our national system; but the usefulness of the concession, on the part of the old adversaries of federal measures, is destroyed by a strenuous opposition to a remedy, upon the only principles that can give it a chance of success.
In cases of capture; of piracy; of the post office; of coins, weights, and measures; of trade with the Indians; of claims under grants of land by different States; and, above all, in the case of trials by courts-marshal in the army and navy, by which death may be inflicted without the intervention of a jury, or even of a civil magistrate; in all these cases the powers of the Confederation operate immediately on the persons and interests of individual citizens.
Strict measures have been taken to put an end to disorder and to re-establish public security.
'He is making game of us,' they said; and the shoemakers seized their yard measures and the tanners their leathern aprons and they gave Big Klaus a good beating.
Did not you promise me, brother, that you would take none of these headstrong measures? Was it not by these headstrong measures that you forced my niece to run away from you in the country?
(though you do not recognize) a Fourth Dimension, which is not colour nor brightness nor anything of the kind, but a true Dimension, although I cannot point out to you its direction, nor can you possibly measure it.' What would you say to such a visitor?
When she took the paste out to bake it, she left smears of dough sticking to the sides of the measure, put the measure on the shelf behind the stove, and let this residue ferment.
The appropriate metre was also here introduced; hence the measure is still called the iambic or lampooning measure, being that in which people lampooned one another.
And Mopsus answered: `Ten thousand is their number, and their measure is a bushel: one fig is left over, which you would not be able to put into the measure.'
Therefore measure not dispatch, by the times of sitting, but by the advancement of the business.