mechanomorphism

mechanomorphism

(ˌmɛkənəʊˈmɔːfɪzəm)
n
the ascription to a nonmechanical thing, such as a person or the universe, of qualities similar to those of machines

mechanomorphism

the concept that God is a mechanical force and that the universe is governed by natural laws. Cf. deism.mechanomorphic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
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References in periodicals archive ?
But in another sense, the mechanomorphism also reflects the newly mechanized warfare of the day: the cavalry's transformation into artillery, the wide bore of Big Bertha, the sudden emergence of the long-distance cannon, the massive destructive power of modern ordnance.
Mechanomorphism, observes biologist and futurist Elisabet Sahtouris, was invented by just one species, anthropos, and is, therefore, "a kind of secondhand anthropomorphism" (quoted on 63).
Anthropomorphism and mechanomorphism: Two faces of the human machine.
(1989) Mechanomorphism and Perceptions of Computer Communication Partners.
And they elicit the same from their human partners: Machine and human mirror each other, anthropomorphism meeting mechanomorphism, and the result is a distinctive form of sensuality--perverse, vaguely disturbing, but endlessly fascinating--that literally embodies the Italian philosopher Mario Perniola's call for a new human able "to give oneself as a thing that feels and to take a thing that feels."
(2) See Gorman Beauchamp, "Mechanomorphism in Hard Times," Studies in the Literary Imagination 22 (1989): 61-77; Michael Hollington, "Physiognomy in Hard Times," Dickens Quarterly 9.2 (1992): 58-66; Philip V.
Successive issues of 291, for example, featured Picabia's now famous drawing of a spark plug called Portrait d'une jeune fille americaine as well as essays of homage to Stieglitz by Marius de Zayas and Paul Haviland, the latter referring to the camera as "the image of [man's] eye; the machine is his 'daughter born without a mother.'" The same year, Krauss notes, Picasso began his portrait of Vollard, in which the "pastiche of Ingres performs a reversal that is nonetheless a repetition of all the despised fruits of mechanomorphism: its frontality, its symmetry, its relentless linearity, its coldness, its (to say the word) classicism."
Her work 'Hydrofantasies & Mechanomorphisms' features six different hydrologic technologies, loosely based on existing technology, such as the proposed solutions for replenishing the Aral Sea and the question of using iceberg towing to supply freshwater.