meconium


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me·co·ni·um

 (mĭ-kō′nē-əm)
n.
A dark green fecal material that accumulates in the fetal intestines and is discharged at or near the time of birth.

[Latin mēcōnium, poppy juice, from Greek mēkōnion, from mēkōn, poppy.]

meconium

(mɪˈkəʊnɪəm)
n
1. (Physiology) the dark green mucoid material that forms the first faeces of a newborn infant
2. (Recreational Drugs) opium or the juice from the opium poppy
[C17: from New Latin, from Latin: poppy juice (used also of infant's excrement because of similarity in colour), from Greek mēkōneion, from mēkōn poppy]

me•co•ni•um

(mɪˈkoʊ ni əm)

n.
the first fecal excretion of a newborn child, composed chiefly of bile, mucus, and epithelial cells.
[1595–1605; < Latin < Greek mēkṓnion opium, meconium, diminutive of mḗkōn poppy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meconium - thick dark green mucoid material that is the first feces of a newborn childmeconium - thick dark green mucoid material that is the first feces of a newborn child
faecal matter, faeces, fecal matter, feces, ordure, BM, dejection, stool - solid excretory product evacuated from the bowels
Translations

me·co·ni·um

n. meconio;
primera fecalización del recién nacido.

meconium

n meconio
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, majority of cases of respiratory distress were due to meconium aspiration syndrome followed by hyaline membrane disease.
Demographics information included gestational age, gender and birth weight of baby, medical and obstetric complications during pregnancy, mode of delivery, neonatal outcome (Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS) and need for admission in nursery) were recorded on a pre-designed proforma.
At autopsy, the pathologist concluded that the cause of death was meconium aspiration and pneumonia, but noted "[m]other's history of drug abuse" as an underlying cause of death, with no apparent support for the statement.
Obstetrics experience throughout the era showed that meconium passage is a possible threatening sign of foetal asphyxia,8 while the reported incidence of meconium stained amniotic fluid is 1-18%.9 Meconium staining of liquor has long been thought to be a conventional sign of foetal distress, but now CTG is an up-to-date practical method for foetal surveillance during pregnancy and labour.10 The current study was conducted to identify the relationship between colours of liquor with the trace of CTG, whether reactive or non-reactive, as well as to APGAR score.
Meconium provides key essential information about fetal exposure to toxic substances and may provide the groundwork for protecting the newborn from further damage [15,16].
Risk factors for severe MAS include thick meconium and an abnormal fetal heart rate.
All patients having meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) who survived with age 60/min) and cyanosis (S P O 2 <87%).
The meconium had been detected in Rochelle's waters at the birthing centre but the newly-qualified midwife, failing to understand its significance, and did not take action for 40 minutes.
494 (48.43%) followed by neonatal sepsis which were 200 (19.61%), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) 74 (7.25%), neonatal jaundice 65 (6.37%), meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) 53 (5.20%), birth asphyxia (BAS) 51 (5%), transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN) 40 (3.92%), congenital malformations 27 (2.65%), infant of diabetic mother 9 (0.88%), neonatal seizures 6 (0.59%) and hemorrhagic disease of the newborn 1 (0.10%).
One of these factors may be the presence of meconium. In a prospective cohort of more than 3,000 women with category II tracings, the presence of meconium--especially thick meconium --was associated with a higher risk of acidemia and neonatal morbidity than was the absence of meconium.
They were dark brown and stained with meconium - the baby's waste - which is a sign it was in distress.