mediacy


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Related to mediacy: mediate

me·di·a·cy

 (mē′dē-ə-sē)
n.
The state or quality of being mediate.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mediacy

(ˈmiːdɪəsɪ)
n
1. the quality or state of being mediate
2. a less common word for mediation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mediacy - the quality of being mediatemediacy - the quality of being mediate  
indirectness - having the characteristic of lacking a true course toward a goal
immediacy, immediateness - lack of an intervening or mediating agency; "the immediacy of television coverage"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(TITLE) "information literacy" or "digital literacy" or "media literacy" or "computer literacy" or "infoliteracy" or "informacy" or "information empowerment" or "Information competency" or "information competence" or "information handling" or "information fluency" or "information mediacy" or "information mastery") AND PUBYEAR > 2000 AND PUBYEAR < 2017)
He writes that the defining characteristics of animal life are the 'three modes' of 'perception, emotion and movement', which 'express the mediacy of animal being' (2010: 206).
Regarding the function of the empirical or biographical author, it should be emphasized that Huhn recently recognized this author as one of the four mediators of incidents (or the story) in poetry as well as in narrative genres (the other three agents of mediacy are the textual subject, or implicit author, speaker or narrator, and protagonist).
This reading is suggested both by Building Stories'$ physical form and by the way it depicts questions of mediacy and materiality.
However, in the end it seems that all the symbolism bears "the curse of mediacy" (27); the revelation is obscured by the medium.
In Molloy the use of monologue, concurrency, and scene is also expected to minimize the mediacy and maximize directness in communication between narrator and reader.
"I want to learn how to write and think electronically"--says Gregory Ulmer (2004, p.10) announcing his academic program for electracy and mediacy. As Kathleen Welch insists (1999, p.104) this electric discourse, this new rhetoric is "an emergent consciousness or mentality within discourse communities, is the new merger of the written and the oral, both now newly empowered and reconstructed by electricity and both dependent on print literacy.
Such text-oriented definitions can focus on "story" (eventfulness, the presence of existents, etc.) or on "discourse" (modality, mediacy, etc.), while some narratologists define the term precisely in the combination of the two (see Abbott The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative, esp.