mediastinum


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me·di·as·ti·num

 (mē′dē-ə-stī′nəm)
n. pl. me·di·as·ti·na (-nə)
The region in mammals between the pleural sacs, containing the heart and all of the thoracic viscera except the lungs.

[New Latin mediastīnum, from neuter of Medieval Latin mediastīnus, medial, middle, from Latin, servant employed on general tasks (Medieval Latin anatomical sense probably influenced by Latin intestīnum, intestine), from medius, middle; see medhyo- in Indo-European roots.]

me′di·as·ti′nal (-nəl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mediastinum

(ˌmiːdɪəˈstaɪnəm)
n, pl -na (-nə)
1. (Anatomy) a membrane between two parts of an organ or cavity such as the pleural tissue between the two lungs
2. (Anatomy) the part of the thoracic cavity that lies between the lungs, containing the heart, trachea, etc
[C16: from medical Latin, neuter of Medieval Latin mediastīnus median, from Latin: low grade of servant, from medius mean]
ˌmediasˈtinal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

me•di•as•ti•num

(ˌmi di æˈstaɪ nəm)

n., pl. -na (-nə)
1. a median septum or partition between two parts of an organ or paired cavities of the body.
2. the area in the chest that lies between the lungs, is bounded by the sternum, the spinal column, and the diaphragm, and contains the heart, esophagus, trachea, and other thoracic structures.
[1535–45; < New Latin < Medieval Latin mediastīnus middle class, derivative of Latin medius mid1]
me`di•as•ti′nal, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mediastinum - the part of the thoracic cavity between the lungs that contains the heart and aorta and esophagus and trachea and thymusmediastinum - the part of the thoracic cavity between the lungs that contains the heart and aorta and esophagus and trachea and thymus
bodily cavity, cavum, cavity - (anatomy) a natural hollow or sinus within the body
chest cavity, thoracic cavity - the cavity in the vertebrate body enclosed by the ribs between the diaphragm and the neck and containing the lungs and heart
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

me·di·as·ti·num

n. mediastino.
1. cavidad entre dos órganos;
2. masa de tejidos y órganos que separa los pulmones.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mediastinum

n mediastino
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Word TERATOMA, was brought into being by Virchow, meaning a monster.1 In 1953, Willis defined teratomas as true tumours comprising of tissues that are exotic to the body part in which they are present.2 Although primarily found in gonads, the most common extra-gonadal site of Germ Cell Tumour(GCT) is the mediastinum constitute 10-15% of anterior mediastinal masses.3 Mature cystic teratomas are the most common among mediastinal GCT's.
Ectopic air in orbital cavities, servical spaces, mediastinum, epidural space, extraperitoneal abdomen and scrotum was depicted on computed tomography of head, neck, thorax and abdomen (Figure 2, 3).
Mediastinal masses present as space occupying masses situated in different compartments of mediastinum namely superior, anterior, middle, and posterior compartments and present with wide variety of signs and symptoms.
Grouping of Lymph Nodes: Lymph nodes were grouped and numbered according to the revised criteria of Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases.9 Cervical lymph nodes were divided into 101, 102, 103 and 104 groups, lymph nodes in the upper mediastinum were divided into 105, 106rec, 106pre and 106tb groups, those in the middle mediastinum were divided into 107, 108, 109 and 112 groups, those in the lower mediastinum were divided into 110 and 111 groups, and those in the abdominal cavity were divided into 1~11 groups.
Free air in the mediastinum can be the sign of a serious complication (1-2).
These glands can be located at any anatomical location from the base of the tongue to the mediastinum. Removal of these ectopic parathyroid glands depends on their size and location.
Among the topics are monitoring the cardiac surgical patient, anaesthetic management for the treatment of mitral and tricuspid valvular heart disease, anesthetic management for surgery of the lungs and mediastinum, extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation for pulmonary or cardiac support, and pain management for cardiothoracic procedures.
The most common masses in the mediastinum include thymoma, lymphoma, pheochromocytoma, germ cell tumors and parathyroid lesions.
Many surgeries are being performed via open and video-assisted techniques for a variety of conditions including resection of benign and malignant tumors of the lung, mediastinum and pleura, repair of bronchopleural fistula, trachea- bronchial reconstruction, esophageal surgery, flexible/ rigid bronchoscopies, airway surgery, and diagnostic thoracoscopies.
In this case, a 4-year-old girl presented with a harsh systolic murmur because of extrinsic compression of the pulmonary artery by a teratoma in the anterior mediastinum [2].
(1) It is also known as spontaneous mediastinal emphysema and is characterized by free air in the mediastinum with the absence of known underlying disease.