medicant

medicant

(ˈmɛdɪkənt)
n
a medicinal substance
References in periodicals archive ?
She discusses the key role of the Portuguese and Spanish merchants, as well as missionaries of the Society of Jesus and the Medicant Orders, followed by the Dutch and English merchants, in spreading the desire for this Asian material culture and creating demand, as well as the commercial networks for the circulation of these goods and the ways they were acquired, used, and appreciated in Europe and the New World, detailing how they changed the everyday life and social customs of the royalty, high-ranking nobility, clergy, and affluent merchant class, and showing that goods made to order led to the creation of hybrid manufactured goods in China and Japan.
Another popular bath-added medicant is oatmeal; you can buy a commercial oatmeal preparation (Aveeno), or make your own by wrapping about a half cup of uncooked rolled oats in a piece of cloth and letting the cereal soak in the bath water.
Chapman had by Lindsay's time already become a mythic medicant figure walking barefoot and unarmed through the forests of America often clothed in only an old sack.
Heating the product, to speed up the drying procedure, is not an option as the medicant in the product would evaporate, altering its taste and potency.
One contaminated carrier was placed in each medicant tube with a sterile wire hook and allowed to remain in contact for 10 minutes.
2] adrenergic agonist has been used by anesthesiologists as a pre medicant since many years.
There has been a resurgence in the entire market for medicant appetite suppressants.
Friday adsfad adf adsf THE NEW Medicants are the artists previously known as Teenage Fanclub and Scud Mountain Boys - two of a number bands they have founded.
In addition, molasses is of value in reducing dust, aiding pellet quality, serving as a vehicle for feeding medicants or other additives, and as a component of mixed liquid supplements.
Most successful is her splendid account of the ways in which pre-Reformation anticlerical literature, with its ridicule of medicants and roguish friars, was adapted to the purposes of Reformation propaganda in works like Simon Fish's Supplication for the Beggars (ca.
These practioners avoid the newer synthetic pharmaceuticals which have powerful actions but often undesirable side effects, in favor of gentle, natural medicants which are slower to act but seldom exhibit any serious side effects.