medicinal


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Related to medicinal: Medicinal plants, medicinal charcoal

me·dic·i·nal

 (mĭ-dĭs′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or having the properties of medicine.
2. Having an unappealing, bitter flavor.
n.
A preparation or product having the properties of a medicine.

me·dic′i·nal·ly adv.

medicinal

(mɛˈdɪsɪnəl)
adj
(Medicine) relating to or having therapeutic properties
n
(Medicine) a medicinal substance
meˈdicinally adv

me•dic•i•nal

(məˈdɪs ə nl)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or having the properties of a medicine; curative; remedial.
2. disagreeably suggestive of medicine: a medicinal taste.
n.
3. a medicinal preparation or product.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin]
me•dic′i•nal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.medicinal - having the properties of medicinemedicinal - having the properties of medicine; "medicative drugs"; "medicinal herbs"; "medicinal properties"
healthful - conducive to good health of body or mind; "a healthful climate"; "a healthful environment"; "healthful nutrition"; "healthful sleep"; "Dickens's relatively healthful exuberance"

medicinal

Translations
شِفائيطِبّي، دَوائي، عِلاجي
léčebnýléčivý
helbredendemedicinsk
læknandi; græîandilæknisfræîilegur; læknandi
liečivý
ilâç türündentedavi edici

medicinal

[meˈdɪsɪnl] ADJmedicinal

medicinal

[mɛˈdɪsənəl] adjmédicinal(e)

medicinal

adjHeil-, heilend; for medicinal purposeszu medizinischen Zwecken; I need a whisky - for medicinal purposes (hum)ich brauche einen Whisky, aus medizinischen Gründen; the medicinal properties of various herbsdie Heilkraft verschiedener Kräuter

medicinal

[mɛˈdɪsɪnl] adjmedicinale, medicamentoso/a

medicine

(ˈmedsin) noun
1. a substance, especially a liquid for swallowing, that is used to treat or keep away disease or illness. a dose of medicine.
2. the science of curing people who are ill, or making their suffering less (especially by means other than surgery). He is studying medicine.
medicinal (məˈdisinl) adjective
1. having the power to heal and used as a medicine. medicinal substances.
2. of healing. for medicinal purposes.
meˈdicinally adverb

medicinal

adj medicinal
References in classic literature ?
ALMOST every country has its medicinal springs famed for their healing virtues.
But now we know that these little pills of classical learning possess the medicinal property of anti-nihilism, and we boldly prescribe them to our patients.
The last ingredient played a very prominent part in the salad; stale eggs and roasted cocks'-combs furnished the grand dish of the repast; the wine even was not without a disgusting taste--it was like a medicinal draught.
As to Mrs Wilkins, she dropt her pearls as fast as the Arabian trees their medicinal gums; for this was a ceremonial which that gentlewoman never omitted on a proper occasion.
He described him as a man of skill in all Christian modes of physical science, and likewise familiar with whatever the savage people could teach in respect to medicinal herbs and roots that grew in the forest.
In this neighborhood, the captain made search for "the great Tar Spring," one of the wonders of the mountains; the medicinal properties of which, he had heard extravagantly lauded by the trappers.
Of course it was only water, but it was out of a bottle, and she always shook the bottle and counted the drops, which gave it a certain medicinal quality.
Perhaps no other country is so generously supplied with medicinal springs as Germany.
He had inherited from his mother some acquaintance with medicinal herbs and their preparation--a little store of wisdom which she had imparted to him as a solemn bequest--but of late years he had had doubts about the lawfulness of applying this knowledge, believing that herbs could have no efficacy without prayer, and that prayer might suffice without herbs; so that the inherited delight he had in wandering in the fields in search of foxglove and dandelion and coltsfoot, began to wear to him the character of a temptation.
It was a medicinal project upon his niece's understanding, which he must consider as at present diseased.
He did not run on leaving Lady Wetherby's house, but he took a very long and very rapid walk, than which in times of stress there are few things of greater medicinal value to the human mind.
That the flowers were of medicinal value, and that the breathing of their odor was a part of the system of cure.