mediocrity


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me·di·oc·ri·ty

 (mē′dē-ŏk′rĭ-tē)
n. pl. me·di·oc·ri·ties
1. The state or quality of being mediocre.
2. Mediocre ability, achievement, or performance.
3. One that displays mediocre qualities.

me·di·oc′ri·tize′ (-tīz′) v.
me·di·oc′ri·ti·za′tion n.

mediocrity

(ˌmiːdɪˈɒkrɪtɪ; ˌmɛd-)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being mediocre
2. a mediocre person or thing

me•di•oc•ri•ty

(ˌmi diˈɒk rɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being mediocre.
2. mediocre ability or accomplishment.
3. a mediocre person.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mediocrity - ordinariness as a consequence of being average and not outstanding
ordinariness, mundaneness, mundanity - the quality of being commonplace and ordinary
2.mediocrity - a person of second-rate ability or value; "a team of aging second-raters"; "shone among the mediocrities who surrounded him"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"

mediocrity

noun
1. insignificance, indifference, inferiority, meanness, ordinariness, unimportance, poorness She lamented the mediocrity of contemporary literature.
2. nonentity, nobody, lightweight (informal), second-rater, cipher, non-person Surrounded by mediocrities, he seemed a towering intellectual.
Quotations
"Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes genius" [Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Valley of Fear]
Translations
وَسَطيَّه
prostřednost
middelmådighed
középszerûség
meîalmennska
priemernosť
bayağılık

mediocrity

[ˌmiːdɪˈɒkrɪtɪ] N
1. (= quality) → mediocridad f
2. (= person) → mediocre mf

mediocrity

[ˌmiːdiˈɒkrəti] nmédiocrité f

mediocrity

n
(= quality)Mittelmäßigkeit f
(= person)kleines Licht

mediocrity

[ˌmiːdɪˈɒkrɪtɪ] nmediocrità f inv

mediocre

(miːdiˈoukə) adjective
not very good or great; ordinary. a mediocre performance/effort.
ˌmediˈocrity (-ˈo-) noun
References in classic literature ?
None of us like mediocrity, but we all reverence perfection.
Mediocrity, no: do not let envy prompt you to the thought.
Narrow-minded mediocrity, envious of my success in my profession, calls me a Swindler.
Fortunately for him she had on the other side Lord Faudel, a most intelligent middle-aged mediocrity, as bald as a ministerial statement in the House of Commons, with whom she was conversing in that intensely earnest manner which is the one unpardonable error, as he remarked once himself, that all really good people fall into, and from which none of them ever quite escape.
I will not hesitate, however, to avow my belief that it has been my singular good fortune to have very early in life fallen in with certain tracks which have conducted me to considerations and maxims, of which I have formed a method that gives me the means, as I think, of gradually augmenting my knowledge, and of raising it by little and little to the highest point which the mediocrity of my talents and the brief duration of my life will permit me to reach.
The term of nine years appears to be a prudent mediocrity between a total exclusion of adopted citizens, whose merits and talents may claim a share in the public confidence, and an indiscriminate and hasty admission of them, which might create a channel for foreign influence on the national councils.
His attentions to Miss King were now the consequence of views solely and hatefully mercenary; and the mediocrity of her fortune proved no longer the moderation of his wishes, but his eagerness to grasp at anything.
You live on your estate, happy in golden mediocrity.
It was only his apprenticed boys whose irrepressible spirits were not affected by the solemn and respectable mediocrity of that artist.
You will take in the whole of the past, you will consider times, persons, and probabilities, and you will feel that they were not least your friends who were educating and preparing you for that mediocrity of condition which seemed to be your lot.
England had been for so long a time given up to herself -- that is to say, to tyranny, mediocrity, and nonsense -- that this return of Charles II.
Men of age object too much, consult too long, adventure too little, repent too soon, and seldom drive business home to the full period, but content themselves with a mediocrity of success.