medium of exchange

(redirected from mediums of exchange)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial.

medium of exchange

n. pl. media of exchange or mediums of exchange
Something, such as a precious metal, that is commonly used in a specific area or among a certain group of people as money.

medium of exchange

n
(Banking & Finance) anything acceptable as a measure of value and a standard of exchange for goods and services in a particular country, region, etc

me′dium of exchange′


n.
something generally accepted as representing a standard of value and exchangeable for goods or services.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.medium of exchange - anything that is generally accepted as a standard of value and a measure of wealth in a particular country or regionmedium of exchange - anything that is generally accepted as a standard of value and a measure of wealth in a particular country or region
criterion, standard, touchstone, measure - a basis for comparison; a reference point against which other things can be evaluated; "the schools comply with federal standards"; "they set the measure for all subsequent work"
legal tender, tender, stamp - something that can be used as an official medium of payment
money - the most common medium of exchange; functions as legal tender; "we tried to collect the money he owed us"
currency - the metal or paper medium of exchange that is presently used
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The lawmakers say they will also look at the ways other states have chosen to regulate Bitcoin and other similar currencies, and review potential problems facing consumers who choose to use the new mediums of exchange.
Generally speaking, digital gold currency (DGC) - or electronic mediums of exchange based on physical gold holdings - is an idea that has been around for years.
of Greenwich) describes the traditional money and exchange mechanisms from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, including the system of shells standing as mediums of exchange, along with fabrics, metals, humans, livestock, salt and pearls, culminating in the definition of a formal exchange rate.