medulla


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Related to medulla: adrenal medulla

me·dul·la

 (mĭ-dŭl′ə)
n. pl. me·dul·las or me·dul·lae (-dŭl′ē)
1. The inner core of certain organs or body structures, such as the marrow of bone.
2. The medulla oblongata.
3. See myelin.
4. Botany
a. The pith in the stems or roots of certain plants.
b. The central portion of a thallus in certain lichens and red or brown algae.

[Middle English, from Latin, perhaps alteration (influenced by medius, middle) of *merulla.]

me·dul′lar, med′ul·lar′y (mĕd′l-ĕr′ē, mə-dŭl′ə-rē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

medulla

(mɪˈdʌlə)
n, pl -las or -lae (-liː)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy
a. the innermost part of an organ or structure
b. short for medulla oblongata
2. (Botany) botany another name for pith4
[C17: from Latin: marrow, pith, probably from medius middle]
meˈdullary, meˈdullar adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

me•dul•la

(məˈdʌl ə)

n., pl. -dul•las, -dul•lae (-ˈdʌl i)
1.
a. the marrow of the bones.
b. the soft marrowlike center of an organ, as the kidney or adrenal gland.
2. the pith of plants.
[1635–45; < Latin: marrow, pith]
med•ul•lar•y (ˈmɛd lˌɛr i, ˈmɛdʒ əˌlɛr i, məˈdʌl ə ri) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·dul·la

(mĭ-dŭl′ə, mĭ-do͞o′lə)
2. The central core of an anatomical structure, such as the adrenal gland or the kidney.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

medulla

The inner part of some organs, including the kidneys; a name for bone marrow.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.medulla - a white fatty substance that forms a medullary sheath around the axis cylinder of some nerve fibersmedulla - a white fatty substance that forms a medullary sheath around the axis cylinder of some nerve fibers
medullary sheath, myelin sheath - a layer of myelin encasing (and insulating) the axons of medullated nerve fibers
fat - a soft greasy substance occurring in organic tissue and consisting of a mixture of lipids (mostly triglycerides); "pizza has too much fat"
2.medulla - lower or hindmost part of the brainmedulla - lower or hindmost part of the brain; continuous with spinal cord; (`bulb' is an old term for medulla oblongata); "the medulla oblongata is the most vital part of the brain because it contains centers controlling breathing and heart functioning"
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
brain stem, brainstem, brain-stem - the part of the brain continuous with the spinal cord and comprising the medulla oblongata and pons and midbrain and parts of the hypothalamus
respiratory center - the center in the medulla oblongata and pons that integrates sensory information about the level of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood and determines the signals to be sent to the respiratory muscles
3.medulla - the inner part of an organ or structure in plant or animal
animal tissue - the tissue in the bodies of animals
adrenal medulla - the medulla of the adrenal gland; secretes epinephrine
plant tissue - the tissue of a plant
cortex - the tissue forming the outer layer of an organ or structure in plant or animal
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Medulla

medulla

[meˈdʌlə] N (medullas or medullae (pl)) [meˈdʌliː]medula f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

medulla

nMark nt; (of spine)Rückenmark nt; (= renal medulla)Nierenmark nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

medulla

[mɪˈdʌlə] n (Anat) (also medulla oblungata) → midollo allungato
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

me·dul·la

n. médula, pop. tuétano, parte interna o central de un órgano;
___ oblongata___ oblongata, bulbo raquídeo, porción de la médula localizada en la base del cráneo;
___ ossium, bone marrow___ ósea.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

medulla

n (pl -lae) (of the brainstem) bulbo raquídeo, médula oblonga; adrenal — médula suprarrenal or adrenal
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
One afternoon at six, when Dulcie was sticking her hat-pin within an eighth of an inch of her medulla oblongata , she said to her chum, Sadie--the girl that waits on you with her left side:
Amelia shall be kneeling near him, with her little hands up; and the picture shall have a grand allegorical title, as the frontispieces have in the Medulla and the spelling-book."
gelidas leto scrutata medullas, Pulmonis rigidi stantes sine vulnere fibras Invenit, et vocem defuncto in corpore qu rit.
However this species contains salazinic acid in the medulla and it is not known outside the Canary Islands (0sthagen & Krog 1976; Krog & 0sthagen 1980).
It obscured the renal medulla and compressed the renal pelvis with associated dilation of the calyces.
By disrupting the reabsorption of these ions, loop diuretics prevent the urine from becoming concentrated and disrupt the generation of a hypertonic renal medulla. Without the concentrating effect of the medulla, water has less of an osmotic driving force to leave the collecting duct system, ultimately resulting in increased urine production.
Abnormalities of serotonin in regions of the medulla oblongata involved in this control have been reported in infants who have died from SIDS.
The samples came from the medulla, a region at the base of the brain that regulates basic body functions.
More discussion is included on the cortex rather than the medulla, reflecting the wider and more complex role of the former in physiological processes, although the pathology of the medulla is examined in the rodent and the human.
Individuals in the control set had the lower length tracheids located next to the medulla. In the medulla-cambium direction, these values increased until stabilizing near a maximum (Table 1).