megafauna


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meg·a·fau·na

 (mĕg′ə-fô′nə)
n. pl. megafauna or meg·a·fau·nas
Large or relatively large animals of a particular region, period, or habitat: Pleistocene megafauna; crabs and other aquatic megafauna.

meg′a·fau′nal adj.

megafauna

(ˈmɛɡəˌfɔːnə)
n
(Zoology) the component of the fauna of a region or period that comprises the larger terrestrial animals

meg·a·fau·na

(mĕg′ə-fô′nə)
Large or relatively large animals of a particular place or time period. Saber-toothed tigers and mastodons belong to the extinct megafauna of the Oligocene and Pleistocene Epochs.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A team of Argentinian scientists from the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET) made the discovery after studying a coprolite taken from a rock-shelter in the country's mountainous Catamarca Province, where the remains of now extinct megafauna have previously been recovered in stratigraphic excavations.
Let us work hand in hand for the protection and conservation of wildlife in Sarangani Bay Protected Seascape," the Megafauna Response Team said
The researchers, part of the marine megafauna movement, brought together by Carlos Duarte, professor of marine science at KAUST, mapped shark positions and revealed "hotspots" of space use in unprecedented detail.
She said the SBPS Megafauna Response Team was formed to address the deaths of marine animals, including turtles, in the area.
For Newby, "Tunisia, which houses the SCF meeting, for the third time, is also the cradle of this Fund, having housed the implementation of its action plan for the conservation of the Saharan megafauna at the Djerba seminar in 1998."
KARACHI -- Collaborative efforts at national and regional levels are immediately required to protect marine megafauna facing multiple threats.
IANS | New York Consumer-grade drones are effective tools for monitoring marine species across multiple sites in the wild, suggests a research opening a platform for scientists and conservationists to study populations of sharks, rays, sea turtles and other marine megafauna. "We found that drones can be used to count and make species-level identifications of marine species, particularly in shallow marine environments," said lead author Enie Hensel from the North Carolina State University.
Large-bodied animals, megafauna, are some of the animals most vulnerable to and impacted by human activities (Lewison et al., 2004; Dirzo et al., 2014).
"Large mammals, or megafauna, such as giant sloths and saber-toothed tigers, which became extinct about 10,000 years ago, were highly evolutionarily distinct," says palaeontologist Matt Davis from Aarhus University, who led the study.
They recovered 1,787 bones belonging to extinct megafauna, such as hippos, crocodiles, giant lemurs, giant tortoise, and elephant birds, dated between 1900 BP and 1100 years BP.