megatherium

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meg·a·the·ri·um

 (mĕg′ə-thîr′ē-əm)
n.
A large extinct ground sloth of the genus Megatherium of the Miocene Epoch through the Pleistocene Epoch.

[New Latin Megathērium, genus name : mega- + Greek thērion, wild beast; see treacle.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

meg·a·the·ri·um

(mĕg′ə-thîr′ē-əm)
A large, extinct ground sloth that lived from the Miocene through the Pleistocene Epochs, primarily in South America. It was as large as an elephant, had long curved claws, and ate plants.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.megatherium - type genus of the MegatheriidaeMegatherium - type genus of the Megatheriidae  
mammal genus - a genus of mammals
family Megatheriidae, Megatheriidae - extinct ground sloths
ground sloth, megathere - gigantic extinct terrestrial sloth-like mammal of the Pliocene and Pleistocene in America
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
First, parts of three heads and other bones of the Megatherium, the huge dimensions of which are expressed by its name.
I found myself gazing at any straggling scion of this strange race with a riveted fascination, just as one would stare at a living mastodon, or a megatherium that had moved in the grey dawn of creation and seen the wonders of that mysterious world that was before the flood.
When I found in La Plata the tooth of a horse embedded with the remains of Mastodon, Megatherium, Toxodon, and other extinct monsters, which all co-existed with still living shells at a very late geological period, I was filled with astonishment; for seeing that the horse, since its introduction by the Spaniards into South America, has run wild over the whole country and has increased in numbers at an unparalleled rate, I asked myself what could so recently have exterminated the former horse under conditions of life apparently so favourable.